Stanford University
coral reef

Stanford Earth Matters

Sea turtle

Bioindicators for monitoring plastic pollution in the North Pacific Ocean

Key marine species can serve as bioindicators to measure how much plastic exists in different ocean regions. (Source: Stanford News)

Three workers in high-visibility yellow vests stand and converse in front of a cement factory below cloudy skies

New 'lab on a chip' may accelerate carbon storage efforts

A tiny new device allows scientists to directly observe and quantify how rocks change in the presence of acids, enabling more accurate assessments of sites for underground storage of carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and industrial waste.

Sand mine edged by green water with two bulldozers viewed from above

Four questions for Eric Lambin on the sand shortage

The Stanford geographer and environmental scientist discusses the sand shortage crisis and what it means for the future of the environment. (Source: Stanford News)

Farmworkers harvesting and shouldering crates of red produce

Extreme heat's impact on labor

Few regulations exist to protect laborers from increasingly frequent extreme heat events. Stanford experts explain extreme heat’s impacts on workplace risks, marginalized communities, and the economy. (Source: Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment)

Blue and green illustration of planet Earth surrounded by windmills, smokestacks, trees, transmission lines, and pump jacks

Replacing the 'take-make-waste' model with sustainable supply chains

The switch to a circular economy could protect the environment while helping companies generate more value. (Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business)

Parent and child on couch in background, with air purifier in foreground

U.S. isn’t ready for the next wildfire smoke wave. Here’s what needs to change

Most government policies for mitigating public health risks from wildfire smoke aim to educate citizens to protect themselves by staying indoors, closing windows, and using air filters. Stanford research shows why that approach fails for Americans across all income groups and points to solutions.

US EPA sign on stone building

Stanford’s Deborah Sivas on Supreme Court’s decision to limit EPA’s powers to fight climate change

Stanford law Professor and environmental law expert Deborah Sivas explains the key points of the SCOTUS decision to reduce the regulatory power of the EPA and discusses the implications for climate change. (Source: Stanford Law School)

Green book in sunlight

Summer reading: Inspiring curiosity and critical thinking about sustainability

Faculty and scholars associated with the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability recommend these 26 books for your summer reading. 

Child points to hazy Seattle skyline

Climate change and air pollution impacts on children’s health

Children are more likely than adults to suffer health impacts due to environmental impacts. Kari Nadeau of Stanford’s Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy & Asthma Research discusses related risks, as well as what caregivers and health care workers can do about them.

road with earthquake damage - external link

Data is transforming our understanding of natural disasters

In this episode of Stanford Engineering’s The Future of Everything, geophysicist Eric Dunham details how new types of data collection and faster computers are helping our knowledge of earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes – and how to prepare for them. (Source: Stanford Engineering)

Aerial view of coastal mobile home park in Pacifica, Calif.

Researchers reveal add-on benefits of natural defenses against sea-level rise

Researchers modeled how investing in environmental conservation and protection can help San Mateo County adapt to rising seas. The findings provide incentives for policymakers to prioritize nature-based approaches when planning for sea-level rise.

West Texas oil activity

Earthquakes from oil field wastewater

Underground disposal of wastewater from fossil fuel production in the nation’s largest oil field is causing long-dormant faults to slip in a way that could damage wells, according to new analyses of satellite and seismicity data.

Moving samples in lab

Q&A: Tracking COVID infections through wastewater

Researchers have developed a system for monitoring COVID prevalence on campus and collaborated with public health officers on an epidemiology project serving a number of communities across California. (Source: Stanford News)

Smoky sunset over Sierra Nevada - external link

How to fight climate change

Environmental scientist Chris Field explains why taking on climate change will require that we continue to reduce emissions and adapt to the effects of increasing temperatures. (Source: Stanford Engineering)

Power lines against pink clouds

Electricity imports within U.S. associated with about 700 premature deaths annually, study finds

More than half of the premature deaths associated with electricity use in most of California and the Northwest occur in other western states that supply electricity to the West Coast.

Tractor on a paddy field in Mekong Delta, Vietnam - External link

Saving the Mekong River Delta from drowning

Southeast Asia’s most productive agricultural region and home to 17 million people could be mostly underwater within a lifetime. Researchers recommend policy solutions including strict regulation of sediment mining, limits on groundwater pumping, and coordination among countries, development agencies and other private and civil society stakeholders. (Source: Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment)

Coral with sunlight

Understanding how sunscreens damage coral

Stanford researchers reveal a mechanism by which oxybenzone, a common sunscreen component, may damage reefs. The surprising findings could help guide the development and marketing of effective, coral-safe sunscreens.

Generation Dread book cover - external link

Climate grief researcher Britt Wray discusses new book

Planetary Postdoctoral Health Fellow Britt Wray discusses her recently published book about dealing with climate anxiety and her own path to finding purpose in a chaotic time. (Source: Stanford News)

Aerial view of Golden Gate Park and city of San Francisco - external link

Massive conservation effort

California has rolled out plans to protect plant and animal life across 30 percent of the state’s most critical land and water by 2030. Biologists Elizabeth Hadly and Mary Ruckelshaus and environmental law expert Deborah Sivas discuss keys to its success, potential impacts, legal precedents, and more. (Source: Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment)

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