Stanford UniversitySchool Resources
coral reef

Stanford Earth Matters

Science and insights for people who care about Earth, its resources and its environment

Get free monthly e-alerts to the latest Stanford Earth Matters stories

Subscribe

About Stanford Earth Matters magazine

Yunnan Province

Overuse of fertilizers and pesticides in China linked to farm size

A new study finds chemicals are often used inefficiently on small farms in China. Land and migration policies may help explain why the country uses 30 percent of the world's fertilizers and pesticides on 9 percent of global cropland.

Charging vehicle

Can utilities afford electric vehicle commitments?

Energy policy expert Michael Wara comments on the decision to approve $768 million in transportation electrification projects and how it could affect utilities, the environment and California ratepayers.

Fruit bat in Kerala

Nipah: A little-known virus that could become the next global pandemic

An outbreak of Nipah in South India has renewed interest in the deadly virus. Stanford epidemiologist Stephen Luby explains risk factors, potential interventions and how land conversion connects to the emergence of this kind of infection.

city heatwave

Climate mitigation could yield trillions in economic benefits

Stanford scientists found that the global economy is likely to benefit from ambitious global warming limits agreed to in the United Nations Paris Agreement.

sage grouse

Judge rules sage grouse was wrongly denied protection

A federal court has ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service improperly ignored its own best science when it made an abrupt about-face and decided not to offer endangered species protections to the bi-state sage grouse.

bicycle silhouette

How our brains learn the look of greener products

A new study suggests people can quickly, if unwittingly, learn visual cues for environmental friendliness. Designers could use the insight to try to trigger thoughts about sustainability when people are shopping. 

exhaust from car

EPA's proposed rollbacks of mileage standards are a terrible idea

Rob Jackson argues in Scientific American that proposed EPA mileage rollbacks are shortsighted and a matter of human health as well as economics.

Smoke Stack drawing

A precedent for climate change litigation?

A trial takes surprising turns and could reshape the legal landscape around climate-change related damages.

surfers with oil rig in background

Stanford law and water quality experts discuss possible offshore oil expansion

If federal plans move ahead, most U.S. coastal waters would be open to offshore oil drilling. Stanford professors look at the issues from California's perspective.

Stack of cut logs in front of forest.

Getting to Zero Deforestation

A synthesis paper led by Eric Lambin reveals the strengths and weaknesses of corporate environmental pledges, and prescribes solutions to boost effectiveness.

Student snorkeling among coral reefs.

Learning through fieldwork in Palau

Undergraduates study links between human and natural systems in a program that puts them up close with corals. Stanford Earth professor Rob Dunbar is a lead instructor. 

Ugandan forest

Paying Farmers Not to Cut Down Trees in Uganda Helps Fight Climate Change

A new study demonstrates a cost-effective strategy to combat climate change by paying farmers in Uganda to conserve and plant trees.

city skyline

Society needs to better understand the economics of climate change

Gaps in social science knowledge of climate change constrain the policy impact of natural science research, a Stanford team argues.

Two stacks

Exploring an effective, low-cost and fair U.S. climate policy

Economist Larry Goulder discusses tradeoffs of policy options and finds ways to enhance societal and economic benefits

Photo credit: Florence Low/DWR

Share the Wealth: A Cap-And-Trade System of Water Conservation and Resiliency?

In order to meet the California’s future water needs, researchers propose a cap and trade approach to water conservation based on local supply and demand realities.

neodymium on the periodic table

Critical minerals scarcity could threaten renewable energy future

The supply chains for critical and rare minerals are vulnerable to political and economic disruptions that could hamper the global shift to a renewable energy future.

Leafy green vegetables in a growing facility.

Grocery store program improves farmers’ adoption of environmental practices

In one of the first analyses of a company-led sustainability program in the food and agriculture space, Stanford researchers found a major grocery chain fostered increased adoption of environmental practices at the farm level.

Steel industry in Benxi, China.

After years of nearly flat growth, global fossil fuel emissions are inching up

An international research team reports that the increase in global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels has resumed after a 3-year respite and may increase again next year. Despite the findings, improved energy efficiency and a booming renewables market provide signs of hope.

maillinkedindouble carrot leftarrow leftdouble carrotplayerinstagramclosecarrotquotefacebooktwitterplusminussearchmenuarrowcloudclock