Stanford University
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Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources

We train the next generation to help solve critical environmental and sustainability challenges.

Photo by Shannon Switzer Swanson

Drive solutions for a sustainable future


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Join us to develop the knowledge, skills, perspectives, and ways of thinking necessary to help solve the world’s most significant environmental and resource sustainability challenges. With our program now in its 20th year, E-IPER students and faculty work across academic disciplines—the physical and natural sciences, engineering, social sciences and humanities, law and policy, medicine, and business—to yield new insights and novel solutions to urgent global problems. They include clean energy, climate change, food security, water quality and quantity, land conservation, human health and sanitation, sustainable cities, ocean health, and biodiversity loss. 

 

Stanford research resources

Check out the many cross-campus research groups and facilities that E-IPER students may access.

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Careers

See where an E-IPER degree can take you from green investing to deep sea research, business or environmental policy. 

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EIPER-related News

Images from a fraught year

Stanford Earth’s 2020 photo contest drew 156 photographs from faculty, students, and staff. The images captured experiences coping with COVID-19, as well as close encounters with nature from activities before the pandemic.

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Which mask works? Researchers find confusion over mask use for wildfire, COVID-19 crises

Drawing from studies on human behavior and responses to past epidemics and wildfire smoke, researchers outline recommendations for communicating correct mask use and suggest areas for further research.

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Accessible healthcare as climate solution

Making high-quality care accessible to local and Indigenous communities was correlated with a 70 percent reduction of deforestation in an Indonesian national park. By offsetting healthcare costs, the community-designed program reduced incentives for illegal logging.

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Prescribed burn associations are one answer to California’s megafires

Rebecca Miller, a PhD student in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, found that bureaucratic hurdles contribute to a lack of burning, as do public perceptions about fire.

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