Stanford University
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Earth System Science

Understanding how our planet works

Our goal is to understand, predict, and respond to human-caused and natural environmental change at local to global scales. Scientists in our Earth System Science department offer strong graduate research programs across a broad range of environmental and Earth science disciplines for students working toward master's and doctoral degrees. Undergraduate and coterminal master's degrees are offered through the closely-related and popular Earth Systems Program.

Research groups in Earth system science

Learn more about our faculty labs and research groups ranging from ocean biogeochemistry to soil science and geohydrology.

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Shared analytical facilities

Students and faculty start their examination of specimens in our comprehensive Earth Materials Preparation lab. Our shared labs offer everything from gas, liquid, and solid analyses to isotopic analysis for geochronology and deciphering (bio)geochemical processes.

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Stanford Geospatial Center

Housed in Branner library, the center offers workshops on Geographic Information Systems (GIS), data management, visualization tools, and spatial analysis.

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Earth system science news

Climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe talks environmental education

Chris Field was joined by climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe in a discussion on science communication and climate change awareness.

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Rice yields plummet and arsenic rises in future climate-soil scenarios

Research combining future climate conditions and arsenic-induced soil stresses predicts rice yields could decline about 40 percent by 2100, a loss that would impact about 2 billion people dependent on the global crop.

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Review: Mosley, Beck and beyond angst

A work of art draws inspiration from Rob Jackson's use of the term "Hellocene" to decribe the impacts of human-caused climate change.

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Opinion: A Scary Year for Climate Change

Rob Jackson says total global carbon dioxide emissions are rising again in 2019, and other scientists’ warnings about climate change have intensified over the past 12 months. Will world leaders finally listen?

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