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Global methane emissions rising due to oil and gas, agriculture

“There’s a lot policymakers and companies can do to cut methane emissions. But in most places around the world, we aren’t doing them,” said Stanford scientist Rob Jackson.

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Methane emissions hit all-time high, scientists say

Methane emissions have hit a record high, driven by coal mining, oil production, natural gas production, landfills and cattle and sheep ranching, according to research from the Global Carbon Project, an initiative led by Rob Jackson. 

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US oil and gas leaks drive global methane emissions spike

"There's a hint that we might be able to reach peak carbon dioxide emissions very soon. But we don't appear to be even close to peak methane," said environmental scientist Rob Jackson.

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Cow burps and fossil fuels: Methane emissions soar to record high

Global emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, have reached the highest levels on record, according to new studies from the Global Carbon Project, a project led by Rob Jackson.

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Methane is on an alarming upward trend

"Cows, oil and gas wells, rice paddies, landfills. These are some of the biggest sources of methane staining the atmosphere today," Rob Jackson and co-authors write in an op-ed describing their newly published studies of global methane emissions.

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The world's methane emissions are at a record high

"Emissions from cattle and other ruminants are almost as large as those from the fossil fuel industry for methane," said Rob Jackson. "People joke about burping cows without realizing how big the source really is."

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Global methane emissions soar to record high

The pandemic has tugged carbon emissions down, temporarily. But levels of the powerful heat-trapping gas methane continue to climb, dragging the world further away from a path that skirts the worst effects of global warming.

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Scientists concerned by 'record high' global methane emissions

Worldwide emissions of methane have hit the “highest levels on record”, according to the latest update to the Global Methane Budget from the Global Carbon Project, an initiative chaired by Stanford's Rob Jackson.

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Global methane levels soar to record high

Livestock farming and oil and gas production are clearly two engines powering rising methane emissions, says Earth system science professor Rob Jackson.

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Phytoplankton enhance Arctic Ocean's ability to soak up carbon dioxide

Research co-authored by Kevin Arrigo of Stanford Earth shows increased phytoplankton biomass is driving a rise in net primary production in the Arctic Ocean, or how fast plants and algae convert sunlight and carbon dioxide into nutrients.

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Cow Burps, Leaky Pipelines Put Earth on High-End Warming Track

Global emissions of methane rose by 9 percent in the decade through 2017, according to a study from the Global Carbon Project, which is led by Rob Jackson.

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Methane emissions have gone up everywhere except Europe

"There are a lot policymakers and companies can do to cut methane emissions. But in most places around the world, we aren't doing them," said Rob Jackson.

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Livestock farming and fossil fuels could drive 4C global heat rise

“CO2 is still the beast to slay but warming from methane is the next most important," said Stanford professor Rob Jackson.

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Methane levels have hit a scary new high, two studies say

“There are a billion and a half more people on Earth than there were in 2000,” said Rob Jackson. “Emissions have gone up because of extra mouths to feed.”

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Global methane emissions reach a record high

“There’s a hint that we might be able to reach peak carbon dioxide emissions very soon. But we don’t appear to be even close to peak methane,” said Stanford professor Rob Jackson.

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