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How to fight climate change

Environmental scientist Chris Field explains why taking on climate change will require that we continue to reduce emissions and adapt to the effects of increasing temperatures. (Source: Stanford Engineering)

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The best stove for your health and the environment

TIME magazine feature covers the harmful health and climate effects of natural gas stoves and possible solutions based on a study led by Rob Jackson's research group.

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What should Southern Californians expect this fire season?

"We're starting the season in a severe drought heading into the warm part of the year, and we know that the kinds of severe heat waves that have really amplified fire risk in recent years are much more likely now than they were previously in California's history," says Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh. 

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Thinking beyond the academic degree

A new certificate program provides a framework for Stanford Earth graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to learn new skills, gain practical experience, and produce portfolio pieces that will broaden their professional preparedness. The program will be carried into the new school focused on climate and sustainability.

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The energy requirements of a good life are surprisingly low

“People in countries like the U.S. are starting to ask what all this extra stuff filling our lives gets us. The answer appears to be very little, perhaps nothing," says Rob Jackson on excessive energy use levels around the world. 

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World doesn't need more energy to end poverty, study says

Billions of people could be lifted out of poverty without boosting global energy consumption, according to a new Stanford study that has deep implications for climate change. 

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How much energy powers a good life? Less than you're using, says a new report

How much energy does it take to have a good and healthy life? A new study led by Earth system science professor Rob Jackson has found that the answer is far less than the average American is using.

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Where the energy link to well-being starts fraying

Human well-being is strongly tethered to energy access, but a new Stanford-led study finds high-consuming countries could scale back consumption without sacrificing health and happiness.

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Study finds high energy use provides little benefit for health and well-being in richer nations

Analysis of data from 140 countries suggests many rich countries could use less energy per capita without compromising health, happiness or prosperity. Countries struggling with energy poverty may be able to maximize well-being with less energy than previously thought.

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Anne Dekas receives NSF CAREER Award

The grant supports early-career faculty who have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization. 

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Personal experience and disaster adaptation

Surveys of people exposed to wildfires and hurricanes show that negative experiences with these events are associated with elevated perceived risk for specific climate hazards and self-reported adaptation behaviors, as well as increased support for interventions. The findings could help shape public communications and policy.

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Why methane is a large and underestimated threat to climate goals

New analysis by Rob Jackson and PhD student Sam Abernethy emphasizes that a reduction in global methane emissions is critical to meeting short-term climate targets. 

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Q&A: Education programs within the new school

Nicole Ardoin and Mark Horowitz discuss exciting new programs and courses within the new school, which will focus on climate and sustainability. 

 

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Stanford researchers identify 'double-hazard' wildfire zones in the West

Stanford scholars Krishna Rao, Alexandra Konings and Noah Diffenbaugh used satellite data to track vegetation dryness patterns over time and identify wildfire vulnerabilities in the West. 

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Rethinking how to measure methane's climate impact

By focusing on the climate impact of methane over a 100-year timeframe, international climate negotiators have underestimated the importance of this short-lived greenhouse gas for achieving Paris climate agreement goals, a new Stanford University study finds.

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Researchers identify 'double-hazard' zones for wildfire in the West

Rapidly growing communities in the American West’s forests and shrublands are nestled in zones where local soil and plant traits amplify the effect of climate change on wildfire hazards and lead to bigger burns.

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