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Jamie Jones leads NSF pandemic preparedness initiative

The researchers aim to advise both NSF and the federal government more broadly about near-term funding priorities and future preparedness. 

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Noah Diffenbaugh discusses carbon neutrality with Governor Newsom

Governor Newsom met with scientists and climate change experts including Diffenbaugh to examine how the state can accelerate progress toward climate targets.

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Tips to protect against wildfire smoke

Warnings of another severe wildfire season abound, as do efforts to reduce the risk of ignition. Yet few are taking precautions against the smoke. Stanford experts advise on contending with hazardous air quality.

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Stanford research shows muskrats are a bellwether for a drying delta

Downstream of hydroelectric dams and Alberta’s oil sands, one of the world’s largest freshwater deltas is drying out. New Stanford University research suggests long-term drying is making it harder for muskrats to recover from massive die-offs. It’s a sign of threats to come for many other species.

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Cleaner air has boosted U.S. corn and soybean yields

The analysis estimates pollution reductions between 1999 and 2019 contributed to about 20 percent of the increase in corn and soybean yield gains during that period – an amount worth about $5 billion per year.

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Floods may be nearly as important as droughts for future carbon accounting

In a 34-year global analysis, researchers found that photosynthesis – an important process for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it in soil – was controlled by extreme wet events nearly as often as droughts in certain locations.

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Summer reading: Igniting curiosity about Earth and imagining our future

Faculty at Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences recommend these 29 books for your summer reading.

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How Congress' hydrofluorocarbon legislation will affect your groceries

Over the next 15 years, the U.S. is set to slash the use of powerful greenhouse gases used in refrigerants. That means changes to your grocery store. "If we can phase out HFCs quickly, we'll reduce global warming by 1 degree Fahrenheit at century's end," said Rob Jackson.

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Elizabeth Miller, Sibyl Diver receive Excellence in Teaching Awards

Recipients of the school’s annual Excellence in Teaching Awards are selected based on nominations from students, faculty, and alumni.

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Stanford Earth graduates: Make your own future

Graduates of the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences have the skills and knowledge to persevere in the face of new challenges and uncertainty, according to Dean Stephan Graham.

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Should solar geoengineering be considered in the fight against climate change?

In a recent episode of "Climate Conversations,” Chris Field discussed the possible risks and benefits of geoengineering and the need for more research. Navigate to Should solar geoengineering be considered in the fight against climate change?

Dave Mucciarone wins 2021 Amy J. Blue Award

Mucciarone, who manages the Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory (SIBL), was honored for being exceptionally dedicated, supportive of colleagues and passionate about his work.

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Stanford explainer: The social cost of carbon

In a Q&A, Stanford economists describe what the social cost of carbon is, how it is calculated and used in policymaking, and how it relates to environmental justice. (Source: Stanford News)

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Fungus creates a fast track for carbon

New research focused on interactions among microbes in water suggests fungal microparasites play a bigger than expected role in aquatic food webs and the global carbon cycle.

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How does climate change affect migration?

April 2021 saw a 20-year high in the number of people stopped at the U.S./Mexico border, and President Joe Biden recently raised the cap on annual refugee admissions. Stanford researchers discuss how climate change’s effect on migration will change, how we can prepare for the impacts and what kind of policies could help alleviate the issue.

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Seven students receive SAA Community Impact Awards

Stanford Earth graduate students Amanda Zerbe, Carl Ziade, Ian Field, Jenna Louie, Krishna Rao, Lauren Abrahams and Marie-Cristine Kaptan have received 2021 Community Impact Awards from the Stanford Alumni Association (SAA) for campus contributions.

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