Stanford University
Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

Geophysics

Understanding Earth. Benefitting Society.

Photo by Hailun Ni

There's only one Earth: We should know how it works

Geophysicists study Earth and planetary processes through laboratory experiments, computational and theoretical modeling, remote imaging, and direct observation. At Stanford, our teaching and research focus on understanding systems critical to the future of civilization. Students apply expertise to fundamental research sustaining life on Earth, combining underlying science with studies of Earth’s environment and resource needs. Such breadth of exposure is highly sought after and leads to careers in academia, industry, and government.

 

Today's Earth science is data driven

The satellite and supercomputer are the tools of modern geoscientists whose work spans from climate change projections to earthquake simulations and energy resources optimization. Stanford Earth scientists are as likely to be in front of an electronic screen, analyzing torrents of remote-sensing data as they are to be drilling ice cores in Antarctica.

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Geophysics-related news

Read the latest school highlights and research news in geophysics

Solar radio signals could be used to monitor melting ice sheets

A new method for seeing through ice sheets using radio signals from the sun could enable cheap, low-power and widespread monitoring of ice sheet evolution and contribution to sea-level rise.

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Sea-level rise may worsen existing Bay Area inequities

Researchers examined the number of households unable to pay for damages from coastal flooding to reveal how sea-level rise could threaten the fabric of Bay Area communities over the next 40 years.

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Ji-In Jung receives NASA award

The geophysics PhD student has been awarded by the Future Investigators in NASA Earth and Space Science and Technology (FINESST) competition. 

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Panel event probes hidden disabilities at Stanford

Stanford Earth's Isabel Carrera, Rosie Ries and Allegra Scheirer discussed living with disabilities that might not be visually perceived and how the university could make campus more welcoming.

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