Stanford University
Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

Geophysics

Understanding Earth. Benefitting Society.

Photo by Hailun Ni

There's only one Earth: We should know how it works

Geophysicists study Earth and planetary processes through laboratory experiments, computational and theoretical modeling, remote imaging, and direct observation. At Stanford, our teaching and research focus on understanding systems critical to the future of civilization. Students apply expertise to fundamental research sustaining life on Earth, combining underlying science with studies of Earth’s environment and resource needs. Such breadth of exposure is highly sought after and leads to careers in academia, industry, and government.

 

Today's Earth science is data driven

The satellite and supercomputer are the tools of modern geoscientists whose work spans from climate change projections to earthquake simulations and energy resources optimization. Stanford Earth scientists are as likely to be in front of an electronic screen, analyzing torrents of remote-sensing data as they are to be drilling ice cores in Antarctica.

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Geophysics-related news

Read the latest school highlights and research news in geophysics

A scientist uses radar technology to map the insides of ice sheets

The technique helps us understand ice sheets right here on Earth -- and whether there could be life far, far beyond. (Source: Stanford Engineering)

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Are we missing a crucial component of sea-level rise?

Across Antarctica, some parts of the base of the ice sheet are frozen, while others are thawed. Scientists show that if some currently frozen areas were also to thaw, it could increase ice loss from glaciers that are not currently major sea-level contributors.

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Four questions for Paul Segall on the Iceland volcano

Stanford geophysicist Paul Segall discusses the Fagradalsfjall volcano currently erupting 20 miles southwest of Reykjavík, Iceland. (Source: Stanford News)

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How an ag-tech startup helps ranchers grow trees

Motivated to increase revenue and contribute to climate impact, livestock farmers are planting more trees on pastureland with the help of Working Trees, a venture co-founded by John Foye, MBA ’22/MS E-IPER, and Aakash Ahamed, a PhD candidate in geophysics.

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