Stanford University
Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

Geophysics

Understanding Earth. Benefitting Society.

Photo by Hailun Ni

There's only one Earth: We should know how it works

Geophysicists study Earth processes through laboratory experiments, computational and theoretical modeling, remote imaging, and direct observation. At Stanford, our research has both fundamental and strategic elements. Students benefit from this breadth of exposure and are sought after for careers in academia, industry, and government. Using high precision imaging and data analysis, our teaching and research focus on earthquakes, volcanoes, environmental hazards, energy, freshwater resources, and Earth's structure and geodynamics.

 

Today's Earth science is data driven

The satellite and supercomputer are the tools of modern geoscientists whose work spans from climate change projections to earthquake simulations and energy resources optimization. Stanford Earth scientists are as likely to be in front of an electronic screen, analyzing torrents of remote-sensing data as they are to be drilling ice cores in Antarctica.

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Geophysics Events

Geophysics-related news

Read the latest school highlights and research news in geophysics

Stanford Earth at AGU 2019

Stanford faculty, students and scholars will join researchers from the Earth and planetary sciences and engage in interdisciplinary collaborations and discussions about the world’s most pressing challenges Dec. 9-13 in San Francisco.

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Stanford Earth hosts inaugural meeting for Bay Area planetary scientists

Stanford Earth faculty members invited scientists from all over the Bay Area to share research and foster local collaborations for an inaugural meeting at Stanford.

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Research reveals fault geometry that forms Himalayas

Researchers have shed new light on the fault responsible for a 2015 earthquake that killed 9,000 people – information that will allow officials to better prepare for future shakers.

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Q&A: Shortages amidst abundance: The paradox of natural gas

Many Americans are ambivalent about natural gas, which produces less carbon dioxide than oil or coal but results in emission of methane, a far more potent greenhouse gas in the short term. Stanford experts weigh in on the subtleties of the issue. 

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