Stanford University
Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

Geophysics

Understanding Earth. Benefitting Society.

Photo by Hailun Ni

There's only one Earth: We should know how it works

Geophysicists study Earth processes through laboratory experiments, computational and theoretical modeling, remote imaging, and direct observation. At Stanford, our research has both fundamental and strategic elements. Students benefit from this breadth of exposure and are sought after for careers in academia, industry, and government. Using high precision imaging and data analysis, our teaching and research focus on earthquakes, volcanoes, environmental hazards, energy, freshwater resources, and Earth's structure and geodynamics.

 

Today's Earth science is data driven

The satellite and supercomputer are the tools of modern geoscientists whose work spans from climate change projections to earthquake simulations and energy resources optimization. Stanford Earth scientists are as likely to be in front of an electronic screen, analyzing torrents of remote-sensing data as they are to be drilling ice cores in Antarctica.

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Geophysics Events

Geophysics-related news

Read the latest school highlights and research news in geophysics

Ice-observing experts gather at Stanford

Stanford Earth is hosting more than 100 scientists from around the world July 8-12 for an International Glaciological Society (IGS) symposium on the cutting-edge field of ice-penetrating radar.

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The mystery of unexplained earthquakes

“This fault was what we call critically stressed – only a small change in conditions could cause that fault to move, which is ultimately what happened,” says Bill Ellsworth in the context of the 2017 Pohang earthquake.

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Two earthquakes shook southern California this week

Geophysicist Greg Beroza comments on what scientists are speculating could be shifts in the Earth’s crust due to large amounts of melting ice.

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Dozens of lakes discovered deep under the Greenland Ice Sheet

Winnie Chu, a postdoctoral researcher in Dustin Schroeder's Radio Glaciology research group, discusses her work using ice-penetrating radar to pinpoint 56 previously unknown lakes.

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