Stanford University
Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

Geophysics

Understanding Earth. Benefitting Society.

Photo by Hailun Ni

There's only one Earth: We should know how it works

Geophysicists study Earth processes through laboratory experiments, computational and theoretical modeling, remote imaging, and direct observation. At Stanford, our research has both fundamental and strategic elements. Students benefit from this breadth of exposure and are sought after for careers in academia, industry, and government. Using high precision imaging and data analysis, our teaching and research focus on earthquakes, volcanoes, environmental hazards, energy, freshwater resources, and Earth's structure and geodynamics.

 

Today's Earth science is data driven

The satellite and supercomputer are the tools of modern geoscientists whose work spans from climate change projections to earthquake simulations and energy resources optimization. Stanford Earth scientists are as likely to be in front of an electronic screen, analyzing torrents of remote-sensing data as they are to be drilling ice cores in Antarctica.

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Geophysics Events

Geophysics-related news

Read the latest school highlights and research news in geophysics

Tiziana Vanorio discusses teaching remotely in response to the novel coronavirus

"The virtual lab is a way to provide them a lab where they can practice any time. If we can make the learning curve less steep and shorten the learning time, then students can focus sooner on research," Vanorio said.

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Stanford Earth researchers awarded by the SEG

The Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) has honored new research on retrieving the subsurface speed of sound, studying waveguide properties of shale gas reservoirs, and using machine learning to characterize rock properties in the subsurface from seismic images.

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Build hills instead of seawalls to defend against tsunamis

New research by scientists including Stanford Earth's Jenny Suckale shows how artificial rolling green hills can help protect vulnerable stretches of coast.

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Waterfront parks could rob tsunamis of their power

When a tsunami slams into a coast, parks with rolling hills could provide about as much protection as towering seawalls, according to research by Stanford Earth geophysicist Jenny Suckale.

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