Stanford University
Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

Geophysics

Understanding Earth. Benefitting Society.

Photo by Hailun Ni

There's only one Earth: We should know how it works

Geophysicists study Earth processes through laboratory experiments, computational and theoretical modeling, remote imaging, and direct observation. At Stanford, our research has both fundamental and strategic elements. Students benefit from this breadth of exposure and are sought after for careers in academia, industry, and government. Using high precision imaging and data analysis, our teaching and research focus on earthquakes, volcanoes, environmental hazards, energy, freshwater resources, and Earth's structure and geodynamics.

 

Today's Earth science is data driven

The satellite and supercomputer are the tools of modern geoscientists whose work spans from climate change projections to earthquake simulations and energy resources optimization. Stanford Earth scientists are as likely to be in front of an electronic screen, analyzing torrents of remote-sensing data as they are to be drilling ice cores in Antarctica.

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Geophysics-related news

Read the latest school highlights and research news in geophysics

Researchers explain earthquakes we can’t feel

Researchers have explained mysterious slow-moving earthquakes known as slow slip events with the help of computer simulations. The answer, they learned, is in rocks’ pores.

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Wastewater injection can make faults twice as likely to fail, quake study says

Mark Zoback and Jens‐Erik Lund Snee find that wastewater injection from oil and gas operations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area makes faults much more likely to slip.

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Many Dallas-Fort Worth area faults have potential to host earthquakes

Researchers have mapped more than 250 faults and found that the majority of faults underlying the Fort Worth Basin are susceptible to earthquakes, some of which extend under highly populated areas in the Dallas-Fort Worth region.

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Branner Earth Sciences Library exhibit celebrates the Apollo missions

Maps and globes of the moon, photos of lunar expeditions and a transcript of a conversation between two Apollo 16 astronauts are on display at Stanford’s Branner Earth Sciences Library & Map Collections until mid-August.

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