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Summer reading: Illuminating our planet and paths toward sustainability

Faculty at Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences recommend these 24 books for your summer reading.

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Stanford Earth dean urges graduates: Turn challenges into opportunities

Graduates of the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences have the knowledge and skills to create an environmentally just and sustainable world for everyone, according to Dean Stephan Graham.

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Dustin Schroeder, Thomas Hayden receive Excellence in Teaching Awards

Recipients of the school’s annual Excellence in Teaching Awards are selected based on nominations from students, faculty, and alumni.

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A steaming cauldron follows the dinosaurs’ demise

The Chicxulub impact crater that is linked to the extinction of the dinosaurs hosted a hydrothermal system that chemically and mineralogically modified more than 100,000 cubic kilometers of Earth’s crust, according to new research.

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Tiziana Vanorio discusses teaching remotely in response to the novel coronavirus

"The virtual lab is a way to provide them a lab where they can practice any time. If we can make the learning curve less steep and shorten the learning time, then students can focus sooner on research," Vanorio said.

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Greg Beroza outlines 10-year research priorities in Earth sciences

Geophysics professor Greg Beroza has co-authored a major new report from the National Academies of Sciences outlining priority research questions for Earth sciences in the next decade.

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Stanford Earth researchers awarded by the SEG

The Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) has honored new research on retrieving the subsurface speed of sound, studying waveguide properties of shale gas reservoirs, and using machine learning to characterize rock properties in the subsurface from seismic images.

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Build hills instead of seawalls to defend against tsunamis

New research by scientists including Stanford Earth's Jenny Suckale shows how artificial rolling green hills can help protect vulnerable stretches of coast.

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Waterfront parks could rob tsunamis of their power

When a tsunami slams into a coast, parks with rolling hills could provide about as much protection as towering seawalls, according to research by Stanford Earth geophysicist Jenny Suckale.

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Rethinking tsunami defense

Careful engineering of low, plant-covered hills along shorelines can mitigate tsunami risks with less disruption of coastal life and lower costs compared to seawalls.

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A new approach to managing earthquake risk from fracking

Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing can damage property and endanger lives. Stanford researchers have developed new guidelines for when to slow or halt fracking operations based on local risks.

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Map of tectonic stresses in North America could help assess tremor risk

Mark Zoback and former PhD student Jens-Erik Lund Snee scientists have produced a comprehensive map of the tectonic stresses acting on the North American continent.

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Seismic map of North America reveals geologic clues, earthquake hazards

A new stress map that reveals the forces acting on the planet’s crust will contribute to safer energy exploration, updated seismic hazard maps and improved knowledge about the Earth.

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California hopes to refill its aquifers

“The images really drew attention to a system that’s out of balance,” says Rosemary Knight, who uses geophysical techniques to find promising areas for groundwater recharge.

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These charts show how coronavirus has 'quieted' the world

As people stopped commuting and traveling, the Earth’s surface vibrated less – and seismologists tracked the change. Stanford Earth's Nate Lindsey and Siyuan Yuan comment.

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Harnessing fiber-optic networks to map earthquake trouble spots

A new study demonstrates the potential for using cities' existing networks of buried optical fibers as an inexpensive observatory for monitoring and studying earthquakes.

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