Stanford University
Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

Geophysics

Understanding Earth. Benefitting Society.

Geophysics News

Current News in Geophysics

Images capture a year of exploration despite uncertainty

The fourth annual Stanford Earth Photo Contest drew images of a dramatic sunset, a menacing shark, an intriguing frog, and a perennial favorite – the Milky Way. The winners were selected among 101 submissions. 

Navigate to Images capture a year of exploration despite uncertainty

Mysterious Moon magnetism explained

New modeling suggests giant, cool blobs of titanium-rich rocks sinking down to the ancient Moon’s hot core could have produced intermittently strong magnetic fields for the first billion years of the Moon’s history.

Navigate to Mysterious Moon magnetism explained

Greg Beroza honored with AGU’s 2021 Beno Gutenberg Lecture

The lecture is presented annually in recognition of outstanding contributions to the field of seismology. Beroza will discuss how Artificial Intelligence (AI) is changing studies of seismicity.

Navigate to Greg Beroza honored with AGU’s 2021 Beno Gutenberg Lecture

Will Lunar Vertex solve the mystery of lunar swirls?

An upcoming lunar mission holds promise for elucidating geologic processes, including Sonia Tikoo's 2018 work to show how heating associated with magmatic activity within the Moon might have amplified localized magnetic fields.

Navigate to Will Lunar Vertex solve the mystery of lunar swirls?

Greg Beroza receives Humboldt Research Award

The geophysicist and Wayne Loel Professor of Earth Science, whose work has covered a breadth of topics in earthquake seismology, is recognized for his research and teaching excellence.

Navigate to Greg Beroza receives Humboldt Research Award

Reasons for hope amid California’s drought

Stanford water experts discuss lessons learned from previous droughts, imperatives for infrastructure investment and pathways for the state to achieve dramatically better conservation and reuse of its most precious resource.

Navigate to Reasons for hope amid California’s drought

How to measure an earthquake through the internet

New technologies that detect motion in the Earth’s crust are emerging in surprising places and reshaping our understanding of earthquakes.

Navigate to How to measure an earthquake through the internet

Inspiring collaboration: Grants empower experts to tackle environmental challenges

Scott Fendorf, Jane Willenbring, Howard Zebker, Alex Konings, Steve Gorelick and Gabrielle Wong-Parodi received awards from the Woods Institute for interdisciplinary research to solve major environmental challenges.

 

Navigate to Inspiring collaboration: Grants empower experts to tackle environmental challenges

Academic structure announced for new school focused on climate and sustainability

The new school will include transitional academic divisions, university-wide cross-cutting themes organized into institutes and an accelerator focused on solutions. 

Navigate to Academic structure announced for new school focused on climate and sustainability

Undergraduates get a taste of Stanford Earth research

This summer, 19 undergraduate students are participating in faculty research projects through the Stanford Earth Summer Undergraduate Research program.

Navigate to Undergraduates get a taste of Stanford Earth research

Scientists test friction laws in the collapsing crater of an erupting volcano

A new analysis of the 2018 collapse of Kīlauea volcano’s caldera helps to confirm the reigning scientific paradigm for how friction works on earthquake faults. The model quantifies the conditions necessary to initiate the kind of caldera collapse that sustains big, damaging eruptions of basaltic volcanoes like Kīlauea and could help to inform forecasting and mitigation.

Navigate to Scientists test friction laws in the collapsing crater of an erupting volcano

Solar radio signals could be used to monitor melting ice sheets

A new method for seeing through ice sheets using radio signals from the sun could enable cheap, low-power and widespread monitoring of ice sheet evolution and contribution to sea-level rise.

Navigate to Solar radio signals could be used to monitor melting ice sheets

Sea-level rise may worsen existing Bay Area inequities

Researchers examined the number of households unable to pay for damages from coastal flooding to reveal how sea-level rise could threaten the fabric of Bay Area communities over the next 40 years.

Navigate to Sea-level rise may worsen existing Bay Area inequities

Ji-In Jung receives NASA award

The geophysics PhD student has been awarded by the Future Investigators in NASA Earth and Space Science and Technology (FINESST) competition. 

Navigate to Ji-In Jung receives NASA award

Panel event probes hidden disabilities at Stanford

Stanford Earth's Isabel Carrera, Rosie Ries and Allegra Scheirer discussed living with disabilities that might not be visually perceived and how the university could make campus more welcoming.

Navigate to Panel event probes hidden disabilities at Stanford
IconsList of icons used on the sitemaillinkedindouble carrot leftarrow leftdouble carrotplayerinstagramclosecarrotquotefacebooktwitterplusminussearchmenuarrowcloudclock