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Stanford Earth at AGU 2019

Stanford faculty, students and scholars will join researchers from the Earth and planetary sciences and engage in interdisciplinary collaborations and discussions about the world’s most pressing challenges Dec. 9-13 in San Francisco.

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Stanford Earth hosts inaugural meeting for Bay Area planetary scientists

Stanford Earth faculty members invited scientists from all over the Bay Area to share research and foster local collaborations for an inaugural meeting at Stanford.

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Research reveals fault geometry that forms Himalayas

Researchers have shed new light on the fault responsible for a 2015 earthquake that killed 9,000 people – information that will allow officials to better prepare for future shakers.

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Q&A: Shortages amidst abundance: The paradox of natural gas

Many Americans are ambivalent about natural gas, which produces less carbon dioxide than oil or coal but results in emission of methane, a far more potent greenhouse gas in the short term. Stanford experts weigh in on the subtleties of the issue. 

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NSF shakes up its earthquake research

NSF is forcing competition while mandating that a single contractor manage its two large facilities for studying Earth’s shape and vibration. This comes as a surprise, “but it’s not dire news. In a way, I kind of welcome it,” says Greg Beroza.

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Interview with Naomi Boness, managing director of NGI

Naomi Boness speaks about the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative and the upcoming North American Gas Forum.

 
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Geophysicist Bill Ellsworth on future earthquakes & looking back at Loma Prieta

“They may be seismically silent, but we know they’re out there,” Bill Ellsworth tells KGO 810 radio about faults in the Bay Area.

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How Loma Prieta changed earthquake science

"Loma Prieta was in many ways a transformative earthquake," says Bill Ellsworth about the 1989 magnitude 6.9 quake that originated in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

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Q&A: 30 years after the Loma Prieta earthquake

Reflecting on the 30th anniversary of Loma Prieta this week, earthquake experts recently shared their perspectives on how the event impacted them, the Bay Area and the research community at large.

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'Stormquakes': Hurricanes and earthquakes can create hybrid natural disaster, study finds

Lucia Gualtieri, an assistant professor of geophysics, speaks about the value of a new study on the combination of two frightening natural phenomena.

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Harnessing data science to understand Earth’s subsurface

The Stanford Natural Gas Initiative hosts the first big data workshop for students and industry leaders on data science techniques for better understanding and managing subsurface resources.

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Still on Shaky Ground: 30 Years After the Loma Prieta Earthquake

“In principle, when we know where the energy is being stored, we can say which places are more likely to have an earthquake and which places less," says Howard Zebker.

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Vintage Radar Film Tracks What’s Beneath Antarctic Ice

Dustin Schroeder speaks about his research using historic radar film to understand glacier melt in Antarctica.

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Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier may be thinning faster than previously thought

“They didn’t know what the shape of the continent was, whether it had mountains — this wasn’t about glaciology or studying ice sheets. It was really fundamental Earth exploration,” says Dusty Schroeder.

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