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Current News in Geophysics

Four researchers receive 2019 AGU Outstanding Student Paper Awards

Tyler Kukla, Chayawan Jaikla, Indraneel Kasmalkar, and Anna Broome have been honored with 2019 OSPAs from the American Geophysical Union.

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What other planets can teach us about Earth

Scientists exploring space are bringing back insights about Earth’s deep past, its complicated relationship with life and our planet’s future.

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Staying grounded in a seismic hotspot

Through the course of her career, Xyoli Pérez-Campos has worked to improve the lives of Mexico’s citizens and guide seismological research. Now, the geophysics PhD alumna is the public face of earthquake science and monitoring in Mexico. 

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Biondo Biondi works with UIT for seismic research

Stanford University IT highlighted a project with geophysics professor Biondo Biondi to transform fiber optic cables buried under the university into seismic sensors for tracking and analyzing ground motions.

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The pros and cons of enhanced geothermal energy systems

"We know that when human activity initiates an earthquake it grows in magnitude," says Stanford Earth's Bill Ellsworth. "As with natural earthquakes, most end up small, but a few grow large."

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Fault dips figured in Kīlauea’s caldera collapse

Paul Segall used ground deformation measurements to create a simplified model of caldera collapse that can explain several surprising features observed in the 2018 Kīlauea eruption.

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What Lies Beneath Is Important for Ice Sheets

“One of the reasons we’re studying Thwaites Glacier is because of its shape,” says Dustin Schroeder, adding that like the Antarctic ice sheets themselves, the massive glacier could have been a big contributor to sea level rise in the past.

 

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Fact or fiction? The science of Star Wars

How did those planets form? Could they exist in our universe? Could Star Wars really happen? Stanford Earth experts on planetary formation, processes and habitability discuss the science behind the fictional saga.

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Photos to inspire a more sustainable world

Stanford Earth's 2019 photo contest drew 226 photographs from around the world from faculty, students, and staff.

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Stanford Earth at AGU 2019

Stanford faculty, students and scholars will join researchers from the Earth and planetary sciences and engage in interdisciplinary collaborations and discussions about the world’s most pressing challenges Dec. 9-13 in San Francisco.

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Stanford Earth hosts inaugural meeting for Bay Area planetary scientists

Stanford Earth faculty members invited scientists from all over the Bay Area to share research and foster local collaborations for an inaugural meeting at Stanford.

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Research reveals fault geometry that forms Himalayas

Researchers have shed new light on the fault responsible for a 2015 earthquake that killed 9,000 people – information that will allow officials to better prepare for future shakers.

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Q&A: Shortages amidst abundance: The paradox of natural gas

Many Americans are ambivalent about natural gas, which produces less carbon dioxide than oil or coal but results in emission of methane, a far more potent greenhouse gas in the short term. Stanford experts weigh in on the subtleties of the issue. 

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NSF shakes up its earthquake research

NSF is forcing competition while mandating that a single contractor manage its two large facilities for studying Earth’s shape and vibration. This comes as a surprise, “but it’s not dire news. In a way, I kind of welcome it,” says Greg Beroza.

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Interview with Naomi Boness, managing director of NGI

Naomi Boness speaks about the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative and the upcoming North American Gas Forum.

 
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Geophysicist Bill Ellsworth on future earthquakes & looking back at Loma Prieta

“They may be seismically silent, but we know they’re out there,” Bill Ellsworth tells KGO 810 radio about faults in the Bay Area.

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