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Thompson Postdoctoral Fellowship

George Thompson
The Stanford University Department of Geophysics is pleased to offer a postdoctoral fellowship honoring our colleague George Thompson, in any field of Geophysics, to outstanding scholars seeking training through pursuit of advanced study. Successful candidates generally use the postdoctoral residency as preparation for full-time academic and/or research careers.

The primary goal of our Thompson Fellowship is to support and assist promising scholars develop into independent investigators. Fellows pursue research in their area of interest guided by Stanford Geophysics faculty, and contribute to the training of graduate students in the department through collaboration on research projects.  The Fellowship can provide funding for up to two years of postdoctoral study, and we encourage Fellows to begin to develop their own research portfolios through submission of research proposals with faculty to augment the fellowship awards.

We welcome all prospective postdoctoral research scholars to apply to this program, regardless of field of study within Geophysics.  The fellowship is open to applicants in any area of Geophysics including new areas of research that cross existing disciplinary boundaries, so that students and recent graduates in Earth science, physics, chemistry, biology, or computational sciences with interests in the geophysical sciences are also encouraged to apply.  The successful candidate will have her/his own independent research agenda, and will work most closely with one (or more) Stanford Geophysics faculty. We encourage prospective applicants to communicate in advance with prospective faculty mentors.

Recipients of the Thompson Fellowship

Matt Siegfried (2017-2018), working with Dusty Schroeder and Jenny Suckale. PhD with Helen Fricker, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, U.C. San Diego. His research interests include subglacial hydrology, ice sheet grounding zone dynamics, ice sheet mass balance, and remote sensing method development and ground-truthing. At Stanford, he plans to focus his research on Antarctic sub-glacial hydrology.
 
Norimitsu Nakata (2013-2015), worked with Greg Beroza and Jesse Lawrence. PhD with Roel Snieder, Center for Wave Phenomena, Colorado School of Mines. Nori's research interests include crustal and global seismology, exploration geophysics, volcanism, and civil engineering. In particular, he studies subsurface and civil structures by using seismic interferometry and attenuation estimation, bandwidth enhancement, and auto-focusing methods. Nori recently joined the School of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Oklahoma as the Wagner Assistant Professor.
 

Lin Liu (2011-2013), worked with Howard Zebker and Rosemary Knight. PhD with John Wahr, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder. Lin's research interests include cryosphere geophysics, near surface geophysics, geodesy, remote sensing, and interactions of the solid earth with the atmosphere, ocean, and cryosphere. In particular, he has been studying the dynamics of the active layer of ice-rich permafrost on the North Slope of Alaska using InSAR. Lin is currently Assistant Professor of Earth System Science at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Darcy Ogden (2008-2010), worked with Paul Segall. PhD with Gary Glatzmaier, U.C. Santa Cruz. Darcy's research interests are in computational fluid dynamics, predicting the hazards of supersonic volcanic eruptions using numerical simulations, supersonic turbulent entrainment, and shock waves. She was most recently an Assistant Professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Charlie Wilson (2003-2004), worked with Simon Klemperer and Biondo Biondi. PhD, University of Colorado Boulder. Charlie currently works as a portfolio manager at Thornburg Investment Management.

Anu Venkatamaran (2002-2003), worked with Greg Beroza. 

How to Apply

The Thompson Fellowship is awarded every two years, and annually when funds permit, and provides salary and research support for a young scientist of unusual distinction. We will next advertise the Fellowship in fall 2017 for a candidate, preferably within two years of receipt of the Ph.D. at the time of application, to start in summer or fall 2018.

Applications should include a cover letter, curriculum vita, a statement of research interests, and the names and email addresses of three individuals from whom the search committee can request letters of reference. The position will remain open until filled. Questions related to your submission may be directed to Csilla Csaplár

 

Contact

Csilla M. Csaplár


(650) 498-6877


csaplar@stanford.edu

 

Stanford University is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to increasing the diversity among its students, staff, and faculty. We welcome nominations of and applications from women, members of minority groups, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities, as well as from others who would bring additional dimensions to the university’s research, teaching and clinical missions.