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Geological Sciences

The study of our planet and its neighbors, from their deep interiors to the surface, and through their multi-billion year history.

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Latest News Related to Geological Sciences

Four researchers receive 2019 AGU Outstanding Student Paper Awards

Tyler Kukla, Chayawan Jaikla, Indraneel Kasmalkar, and Anna Broome have been honored with 2019 OSPAs from the American Geophysical Union.

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What other planets can teach us about Earth

Scientists exploring space are bringing back insights about Earth’s deep past, its complicated relationship with life and our planet’s future.

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How did marine animals become so diverse?

Upending an evolutionary theory proposed in the 1950s, scientists have found that the groups most resistant to extinction also contain the greatest ecological diversity – their members perform a larger number of different functions in ecosystems.

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Scientists find way to make diamonds quickly and easily

Stanford Earth's Rodney Ewing and Wendy Mao help discover a new way to create diamonds by "cheating" thermodynamics.  

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A better way to build diamonds

With the right amount of pressure and surprisingly little heat, a substance found in fossil fuels can transform into pure diamond.

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No 2020 Democrat wants to store nuclear waste under Yucca Mountain

"It's not a surprise that no one would support Yucca," says Stanford's Rodney Ewing, who led a 2018 study that recommended moving responsibility for disposing of nuclear waste to an independent nonprofit corporation.

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Smaller animals faced surprisingly long odds in ancient oceans, Stanford study finds

New fossil research shows extinction for smaller marine animals across most of the past 485 million years was more common than once believed. Why?

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One of these astronauts could be the first woman on the moon

After a rigorous selection process, Stanford Geological and Environmental Sciences alumna Jessica Watkins, BS '10, has been selected as one of the five women to join NASA as an active astronaut.

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No nuke waste at Great Lakes

Nuclear waste must be moved to dry-cast storage, which "is probably safe for tens of hundreds of years but shouldn’t be considered a final solution," says Rod Ewing .

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Scientists discover the world’s oldest forest and its radical impact on life

The world's oldest trees, like those at Cairo, have a big effect on the ancient climate though weathering that causes chemical reactions, says Kevin Boyce.

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Fact or fiction? The science of Star Wars

How did those planets form? Could they exist in our universe? Could Star Wars really happen? Stanford Earth experts on planetary formation, processes and habitability discuss the science behind the fictional saga.

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Why some planets eat their own skies

A new study suggests a reason why exoplanets rarely grow larger than Neptune: the planet’s magma oceans begin to eat the sky.

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Plants slow river migration

Mathieu Lapôtre's research helps quantify how vegetation influences river mobility and proposes a new theory on how river movement may have influenced ancient Earth’s climate.

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Photos to inspire a more sustainable world

Stanford Earth's 2019 photo contest drew 226 photographs from around the world from faculty, students, and staff.

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Stanford Earth at AGU 2019

Stanford faculty, students and scholars will join researchers from the Earth and planetary sciences and engage in interdisciplinary collaborations and discussions about the world’s most pressing challenges Dec. 9-13 in San Francisco.

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