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Geological Sciences

The study of our planet and its neighbors, from their deep interiors to the surface, and through their multi-billion year history.

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Latest News Related to Geological Sciences

The 'great dying': Rapid warming caused largest extinction event ever

A study co-authored by Erik Sperling and Jon Payne shows rapid global warming caused the largest extinction event in the Earth’s history, which wiped out the vast majority of marine and terrestrial animals on the planet.

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What caused Earth's biggest mass extinction?

Scientists have debated until now what made Earth's oceans so inhospitable to life that some 96 percent of marine species died off at the end of the Permian period. New research shows the "Great Dying" was caused by global warming that left ocean animals unable to breathe.

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Stanford Earth photos inspire science and wonder

Stanford Earth's 2018 photo contest drew nearly 200 photographs from around the world from faculty, students, and staff. Photos captured the natural world, students at work in the field, and research in the lab.

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Elizabeth Miller receives GSA career award

Elizabeth Miller has been awarded the 2018 Structural Geology & Tectonics Career Contribution Award from the Geological Society of America.

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Jon Payne on People Behind the Science Podcast

Geological Sciences professor Jon Payne discusses a range of life experiences, from hobbies and home life to the trials and successes of his research.

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Sharing science in South Africa

During the summer of 2018, eight students traveled to South Africa with the Stanford Alpine Project (SAP), an organization that gives Stanford students a chance to design and implement a student-led field excursion that is accessible to all Earth scientists. 

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Stanford Earth alumnus receives 2018 Knowles Teaching Fellowship

San Lorenzo High School teacher Ian Hagmann, MS '15 has been awarded a five-year fellowship that includes stipends, funds for professional development, grants for teaching materials and opportunities for leadership development.

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The Giants of California: How Redwoods and Whales Got So Big

Will Gearty, a PhD student in Jonathan Payne's lab, discusses his work exploring the factors that affect the body size of aquatic mammals.

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Bullets, Blood and Ice

Professor Emeritus of Geological Sciences Dennis Bird shares tales of his life as a scientist, from mentoring students on Stanford's campus to unraveling geochemical mysteries in Greenland.

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The steep costs of nuclear waste in the U.S.

Expert Rodney C. Ewing discusses how failure to implement a permanent solution for nuclear waste storage and disposal is costing Americans billions of dollars per year. 

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2018 VPGE Fellows

The 2018 recipients of fellowships and awards administered by the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education (VPGE) include doctoral students in the departments of Geology, Geophysics, Earth System Science, Energy Resources Engineering, and the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER).

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Beyond lava and ash: What makes volcanoes dangerous?

Recent eruptions offer reminders that lava, ash and size don’t fully explain how volcanoes become deadly. Geologists Gail Mahood and Donald Lowe describe some of the science and mysteries behind volcanic hazards. 

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Stanford Earth graduates urged to do good and be agile

Graduates of the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences are poised to thrive amid a “scientific revolution” being driven by new technologies and computational power, according to Dean Stephan Graham. 

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How a uranium hunter sniffs out nuclear weapons

Radioactive mineral samples collected by Stanford Earth professor Rodney Ewing could aid a Department of Homeland Security project aiming to hunt down the source of illegal nuclear material that could end up in bombs.

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Quantifying uncertainty about Earth's resources

Geological Sciences professor Jef Caers discusses his new book, which explores how quantifying uncertainty can inform exploration, appraisal and development of subsurface resources. 

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A new take on the field trip? There's an app for that

A new teaching tool created by a Stanford faculty member hosts student-generated virtual journeys that enrich visits to actual locations and allow other students to take field trips from home  

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