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Media Mentions

The oil industry is leaking a whole lot of methane gas

Earth System Science professor Rob Jackson comments on new research showing that the U.S. EPA has underestimated methane emissions. Stanford Earth’s Adam Brandt is a co-author on the study.

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Natural gas could warm the planet as much as coal in the short term

Stanford Earth’s Rob Jackson comments on a new study that “comprehensively confirms earlier findings that methane leaks are underestimated.”

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Earthquakes could be detected using undersea telecom cables

New research builds on work led by Stanford Earth geophysicist Biondo Biondi involving optical fibers for earthquake detection.

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Groundwater holding own against drilling boom

Rob Jackson of Stanford Earth challenges a new study’s assertion that elevated methane levels in Pennsylvania water wells are unrelated to natural gas development.

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Kilauea’s eruption reignites debate over geothermal plant

Stanford Earth's Roland Horne comments on the value of geothermal energy as an alternative to oil or intermittent renewables around Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano.

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Groundwater overpumping boosts arsenic in California aquifer

Research by Stanford Earth’s Ryan Smith, Rosemary Knight and Scott Fendorf shows overpumping groundwater could cause deadly water quality problems.

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Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate

Matthew Siegfried, a postdoctoral researcher working with Dustin Schroeder in the Stanford Radio Glaciology Group, co-authored an article in The Conversation about the importance of understanding variations in the height of Antarctic ice shelves.

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How a uranium hunter sniffs out nuclear weapons

Radioactive mineral samples collected by Stanford Earth professor Rodney Ewing could aid a Department of Homeland Security project aiming to hunt down the source of illegal nuclear material that could end up in bombs.

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Why Guatemala's volcano has been more deadly than Hawaii's

Stanford geophysicist Paul Segall explains key differences between recent eruptions in Hawaii and Guatemala, and why some volcanoes pose far greater hazard to life than others.

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Cost plunges for capturing carbon dioxide from the air

Stanford climate scientist Chris field comments on progress in estimating the cost of pulling CO2 from the air and recycling it into synthetic fuels.

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Quantifying uncertainty about Earth's resources

Geological Sciences professor Jef Caers discusses his new book, which explores how quantifying uncertainty can inform exploration, appraisal and development of subsurface resources. 

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Don't expect short-term earthquake predictions

William Ellsworth of Stanford Earth explains why small foreshocks don't yet offer a sort of tectonic alert system, and what steps should be taken now to boost resilience when "the big one" hits.

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Foreshocks debunked as earthquake predictor

New data on the 1999 disaster in Izmit, Turkey shows little quakes preceding the big one were unrelated and detecting foreshocks won't help predict major quakes. Bill Ellsworth of Stanford Earth led the research.

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Another danger from overpumping groundwater: Arsenic

Geophysics professor Rosemary Knight comments on a study she co-authored showing that sinking land caused by intensive groundwater pumping in California is releasing trapped arsenic, a known carcinogen.

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Side effect of overpumping Central Valley groundwater: Too much arsenic

Ryan Smith, a doctoral candidate in geophysics, explains research he led showing that continued heavy pumping of groundwater in the Central Valley could threaten water supplies with arsenic contamination.

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Can foreshocks predict larger earthquakes?

Stanford Earth geophysicist Bill Ellsworth explains his research showing that tremors preceding a 1999 earthquake in Turkey were no different than ordinary earthquakes - not warnings of the bigger quake to come.

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