Stanford University

Media Mentions

Congress must act to solve the methane problem

Rob Jackson co-authored an op-ed about ways that policymakers can reduce methane emissions. 

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Extreme melt events can permanently alter structure of an ice sheet

Dustin Schroeder used a unique modeling technique that captured meltwater data near the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

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Jordan faces a climate crisis

Research led by Steve Gorelick found that Jordan's annual rainfall could be reduced 30 percent by 2100. Supplemental resources are limited, making the situation bleak. 

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Should we block the Sun? Scientists say the time has come to study it.

“Solar geoengineering is not a substitute for decarbonizing,” said Chris Field, adding that technology to reflect sunlight “should be researched as rapidly and effectively as possible.”

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Study suggests damaged Amazon is now worsening climate change

"The Amazon is vulnerable, and we tend to get tunnel vision about one greenhouse gas alone," said Rob Jackson, a leading expert in global emissions. 

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Outer space is a treasure chest of gemstones

“We can form all sorts of gemstones potentially in space, as long as you have the right chemistry in the right temperature and conditions,” said Stanford Earth professor Wendy Mao.

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Wildfire smoke makes up half of small particle pollution in Western US

"Most people do not see sea-level rise. Most people do not ever see hurricanes. Many, many people will see wildfire smoke from climate change," said Stanford environmental economist Marshall Burke. 

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Wildfire smoke now causes up to half the fine-particle pollution in Western U.S.

“We know smoke is bad for health. But we really didn’t have a comprehensive national picture for how much wildfires are contributing to poor air quality,” said Marshall Burke.

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Wildfire smoke to blame for up to half of soot pollution in parts of western US

Wildfire smoke has resulted in as much as half of the soot pollution in parts of the western U.S., according to a study led by Stanford environmental economist Marshall Burke.

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US flood damage rose 30 percent in 30 years, a sign of warming

“This shows that there is real economic value in avoiding higher levels of global warming,” said Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh. “That’s not a political statement. That’s a factual statement about costs."

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Climate change drove $75 billion in rainfall damage over the past 30 years

Research by Frances Davenport, Noah Diffenbaugh  and Marshall Burke shows that over the past three decades, the U.S. has had nearly $75 billion in damage from floods fueled by the climate crisis. 

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Climate change blamed for a third of U.S. flood losses in past 3 decades

“The more global warming we get, the more we can expect these damages to increase – and reductions (in emissions) will have value in terms of avoided costs,” said climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh.

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Turning Stockton into 'an oasis of joy'

“Unless global emissions are curbed, the trajectory we’re on as a civilization will likely lead to greater than 3 degrees [Celsius],” said Stanford's Noah Diffenbaugh. Work to mitigate the looming effects of climate change is unifying Stockton, California.

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California's 'new climate'

“We have clear evidence that not only California has warmed, but that California is now in a new climate that is both warmer overall and is much more likely to experience unprecedented hot conditions,” said climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh.

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Using machine learning to study anatomy, weather and earthquakes

Stanford Earth research scientist Mostafa Mousavi found a way of teasing out evidence of tiny earthquakes that went unnoticed but still left a record in the data. 

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Covid-19 and climate change will remain inextricably linked

In an analysis published in March, Marshall Burke found that a coronavirus lockdown in China probably saved more lives from a reduction in air pollution – which is linked to climate change – than it lost to Covid-19. 

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