Stanford University

Media Mentions

White House creates new energy division to coordinate climate change policies

The White House has launched a new energy division of its Office of Science and Technology Policy and appointed Sally Benson, a well-known energy expert at Stanford University, to a high-level position to coordinate climate change policy.

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Got to fly like an eagle (by which we mean, have an insignificant carbon footprint)

Evan Sherwin, a postdoctoral researcher in energy resources engineering, discusses sustainable aviation fuels designed to lower the emissions generated by air travel. 

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Dozens of Yellowstone-sized volcanoes once drowned Nevada in thousands of feet of lava

New research by Elizabeth Miller suggests the ancestral Sierra Nevada range and the mountains we see today were born at different times.

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Global emissions rebound to pre-pandemic levels

In an op-ed, Rob Jackson, Sam Abernethy and coauthors write that after months of social distancing and stay-at-home orders, economies are reopening, and carbon dioxide levels are rising.

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Emissions drastically underreported, Washington Post investigation finds

An investigation of 196 countries by the Washington Post found that emissions are underreported by billions of tons. Stanford Earth scientist Rob Jackson explains why.

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The magic 1.5: What’s behind climate talks’ key elusive goal

The Paris climate agreement set a goal of limiting warming to “2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius.” In a way, both thresholds are "somewhat arbitrary,” said Stanford's Rob Jackson. “Every tenth of a degree matters!”

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Countries' climate pledges built on flawed data

“If we don’t know the state of emissions today, we don’t know whether we’re cutting emissions meaningfully and substantially,” said Rob Jackson. “The atmosphere ultimately is the truth. The atmosphere is what we care about.”

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A new effort to help communities adapt to climate change

Marshall Burke, Noah Diffenbaugh and Gabrielle Wong-Parodi are interviewed in a segment about a unique partnership in California that uses behavioral science and cultural awareness in climate studies to help communities cope with extreme weather.

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Coal sends global emissions to pre-pandemic highs

"I wasn't surprised to see a rebound," said Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson. "I was surprised to see emissions bounce back like a rubber band." 

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Carbon emissions are back to pre-pandemic levels

Rob Jackson, a Stanford professor of Earth system science, discusses new estimates of global carbon emissions. One surprising finding is that emissions came roaring back, not trickling as they did after the 2008 recession.

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Carbon dioxide emissions rebounded sharply after pandemic dip

"We might have seen emissions snap back this year in any case, since it’s tough to completely change the global energy system in a single year, but we could have set ourselves up much better for future years," said Rob Jackson, professor of Earth system science.

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Pandemic dip in carbon emissions was temporary, report says

Carbon dioxide emissions are on track to rise in every country and region in the world this year compared with 2020. “We thought global coal use had peaked in 2014, but we’re perilously close to that value again this year,” said Rob Jackson.

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Carbon levels are rising again after brief COVID drop

New estimates from the Global Carbon Project, chaired by Stanford Earth professor Rob Jackson, vividly illustrate the global challenge posed by decades of delayed climate policy and investment.

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New report expects global emissions of carbon dioxide to rebound to pre-pandemic high this year

“Treading water for global fossil carbon emissions like we’re doing now is closer to drowning when it comes to climate change,” said Rob Jackson.

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How life reemerges from cataclysms

Research led by Pedro Monarrez of Stanford Earth shows that the usual rules of body size evolution change not only during mass extinctions but also during subsequent recovery.

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Supercell thunderstorms shake up the stratosphere

Research led by Stanford Earth's Morgan O'Neill shows supercell storm tops may act like mountains that obstruct winds, transforming their flow into violent turbulence that mixes near-surface air with the stratosphere above.

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