Stanford University

Media Mentions

San Francisco should look to nature to respond to sea-level rise

"Ecosystem-based adaptation needs to be prioritized as the cheapest, most effective and most resilient strategy to protect the city from the quickly worsening impacts of climate change," Stanford Earth undergraduate student Jacqueline Vogel writes in an op-ed.

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Climate research needs to help communities plan for the future

A Rutgers climate scientist highlights former Stanford Earth dean Pam Matson as a pioneer in recognizing "stakeholders outside of academia as critical partners throughout the research process."

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We can't rely solely on renewable energy yet

Making it cheaper for businesses to invest in carbon capture and storage is the best way to immediately reduce fossil fuel emissions, writes Stanford Earth professor and Precourt Institute co-director Sally Benson.

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Pretty soon we'll have to stop blaming China for global carbon emissions

“No one country can stabilize the global temperature just by stabilizing its emissions,” says Stanford Earth professor Noah Diffenbaugh. "This is why climate policy presents some clear challenges."

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Largest delta plain in Earth's history discovered in Arctic

"The Triassic delta plain system build across this shelf region is truly vast," says Stanford Earth professor Elizabeth Miller, commenting on a new study of deposits now located in the Barents Sea.

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Growth in U.S., Asia fueled record carbon levels in 2018

"We had three years where global emissions were essentially flat. 2017 was a slight uptick. We wondered if it was a blip. It's not. This increase in global emissions is real and more difficult to address than I expected," says Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson.

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Coal still king as global carbon emissions soar

Coal remains the planet's top source for electricity. As global carbon emissions continue to rise, “the clock is ticking in our struggle to keep warming below 2 degrees," says Stanford Earth professor Rob Jackson.

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Haikus About Space/Make Science Less Tedious/So Hope Scientists

Geological sciences PhD candidate Zack Burton's is featured for distilling presentations into poems. Poetry, he says, is a perfect way to convey science in the internet age. Like everything else online, “poems are bingeable.”

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In blow to climate, coal plants emitted more than ever in 2018

“The climate consequences are catastrophic. I don’t use any word like that very often. But we are headed for disaster, and nobody seems to be able to slow things down," says Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson.

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Hot records falling twice as often as cold ones

“As a measure of climate change, the dailies (temperature records) will tell you more about what’s happening,” said Chris Field of Stanford. “The impacts of climate change almost always come packaged in extremes.”

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Can 'Meatless Mondays' at New York City public schools curb emissions?

“Fast-food beef, often shipped from the tropics, can release carbon from deforestation. Belching cattle are one of the biggest methane sources from human activities," says Stanford's Rob Jackson.

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Radioactive beads may reveal how Fukushima's meltdown unfolded

Microscopic particles unleashed by the nuclear plant's explosions may pose an under-recognized health risk – a discovery that has been not very welcomed in Japan, says Rod Ewing of Stanford Earth.

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It's 2050 and this is how we stopped climate change

"We just had to kind of bite the bullet and say, 'OK, if you're making cement or steel, you are capturing and sequestering that CO2,'" says Stanford Earth professor and Precourt Institute for Energy director Sally Benson.

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Stanford scientists navigate their religious and academic identities

For Jenny Saltzman, Director of Outreach Education at Stanford Earth, “the weaving of science and spirituality has always been something of interest, of beauty.” 

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School lessons targeted by climate change doubters

“When people say we ought to present two sides, they’re saying we ought to present a side that’s totally been disproven along with a side that has been fundamentally supported by the evidence,” says Stanford's Chris Field.

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Is climate change creating more tornadoes?

"With respect to tornadoes, we have limitations both in the observational record and in our modeling capabilities," says Noah Diffenbaugh. Researchers are now closing those gaps, thanks to radar observations of tornadoes over the past couple decades.

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