Stanford University

Media Mentions

Stanford's O'Donohue farm connects community with small-scale agriculture

"Slowing down and working with your hands and being connected to the earth in that way is very important," says farm volunteer Mark Ferguson. "It's easy to forget that nature is all around us."

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Confronting climate change, Louisiana shifts toward retreat

"There's an ad hoc retreat happening in the world around us," says Stanford Earth's Katharine Mach – and it's a matter of time before the pressures toward retreat will mount from all directions. 

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Are we seeing more hail in a warmer, wetter world? Experts say not yet.

A reliable baseline for hail observations simply doesn’t exist yet. Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh says, “we need well-developed, long-term observational records” to detect trends in hail. Navigate to Are we seeing more hail in a warmer, wetter world? Experts say not yet.

As climate change intensifies, the risk of armed conflict will increase

Researchers led by Stanford's Katharine Mach estimate that over the last century, climate has influenced up to 20 percent of armed conflict risk and that this percentage will increase dramatically.

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Climate change will increase risk of violent conflict, researchers warn

Experts led by Stanford's Katharine Mach conclude that while climate change has not so far played a large role in stoking conflict, it will play a far greater role in destabilizing countries as the planet warms.

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Climate changes not causing wars – yet

Researchers led by Stanford's Katharine Mach have found that while the influence of climate is tangible, affecting and exacerbating conflicts, it has not so far been the root cause of war. Navigate to Climate changes not causing wars – yet

Plan to reclassify radioactive nuclear waste spurs anger

Yucca Mountain has suffered from "technical and political disagreement" for decades, says Rod Ewing of Stanford. "There's an understandable pressure to do something with at least some of the waste." Navigate to Plan to reclassify radioactive nuclear waste spurs anger

We could curb the effects of climate change by turning methane into CO2

A team of researchers led by Stanford's Rob Jackson have found that converting methane into carbon dioxide might reduce the amount of heat getting trapped on the planet.

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What's new in corporate renewables

A recent paper from Stanford's Sally Benson explores the difference in yearly averages and fluctuations in the power mix from hour to hour — and what it means for climate change. Navigate to What's new in corporate renewables

Venus is Earth's evil twin, and space agencies can't resist its pull

“There is growing realization within the exoplanet community that Venus is the best analogue in the Solar System for many of the rocky exoplanets we have found,” says geological sciences professor Laura Schaefer. Navigate to Venus is Earth's evil twin, and space agencies can't resist its pull

Thousands of Americans are expected to perish during future heat waves

Noah Diffenbaugh's research has found that, if carbon emissions keep increasing, much of the globe will experience "the permanent emergence of unprecedented summer heat" in the coming decades. Navigate to Thousands of Americans are expected to perish during future heat waves

Enormous plankton blooms fueled by vents deep in Earth's belly

A study co-authored by Stanford Earth's Kevin Arrigo and Mathieu Ardyna suggests the goings on in the deep ocean could play a bigger role with surface ecosystems than previously thought.

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Powerful deep-ocean vents fuel phytoplankton blooms off Antarctica

Recent ocean modeling has suggested hydrothermal vents play a key role in how nutrients move through the ocean column. A study from Kevin Arrigo and Mathieu Ardyna confirms model predictions with real observations. Navigate to Powerful deep-ocean vents fuel phytoplankton blooms off Antarctica

Hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor trigger huge phytoplankton blooms

Research by Stanford Earth's Kevin Arrigo and Mathieu Ardyna suggests hydrothermal vents on the seafloor may have a larger impact on life near the water's surface and on the global carbon cycle than once thought.

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Confronting climate change, Louisiana shifts from resilience to retreat

"There's an ad hoc retreat happening in the world around us. In the aftermath of Katrina for example, a lot of people didn't go back, properties were abandoned," says Stanford's Katharine Mach.

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Where will all the water go?

A hundred years ago, some California droughts were “hot” or “cool." There’s been a dramatic shift in the past couple of decades, though, as demonstrated in research led by Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh. Navigate to Where will all the water go?
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