Stanford University

Media Mentions

Concrete is worse for the climate than flying. Why aren’t more people talking about it?

“Cement emissions have grown faster than most other carbon sources,” says Stanford Earth system science professor Rob Jackson, adding that the climbing emissions can largely be tied to increased manufacturing in China.

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Cement carbon dioxide emissions quietly double in 20 years

“Our primary focus needs to be on fossil fuel use because that’s where most emissions come from,” says Stanford professor Rob Jackson. “I don’t think cement is on most policymakers’ radar.”

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Odds for record-breaking heat events have ‘doubled or tripled’ due to climate change

Since 1900, Earth's average air temperature has increased by 1.1 degrees Celsius. The odds of a record heat event or extreme heat day have doubled or tripled, says Stanford's Noah Diffenbaugh. “These types of conditions are increasing, it’s not just your imagination.”

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How CA's ancient hidden waterways could be key to recharging state's depleted groundwater

To help find potential groundwater recharge sites, helicopters deploy spaceship-sized antennas and ping the ground with electromagnetic signals, mapping the geology deep below the surface. The technique was piloted in California by researchers at Stanford, led by Rosemary Knight.

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Study measures solution for sinking California, finds it may take more to reverse damage

"Much of the modeling that's been done in preparation of groundwater sustainability plans throughout the state assumes that if you stop the water level going down, the subsidence is going to stop. But that's wrong," says Stanford geophysicist Rosemary Knight.

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Land is sinking as groundwater levels drop. New research shows how California could fix it.

In a new study, Stanford's Rosemary Knight and Matt Lees examined the sinking in one area of the San Joaquin Valley over 65 years and projected that subsidence will likely continue for decades or centuries, even if aquifer levels were to stop declining.

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Cutting air pollution could boost crop yields by up to 28 percent

Analysis of air pollution and crop health via satellite imagery led by Stanford's David Lobell suggests that limiting emissions of nitrogen dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas, could boost crop yields by up to 28 percent.

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Small nuclear reactors won't avoid the problem of radioactive waste

So-called small modular reactors are promoted as less expensive and cumbersome than conventional light-water reactors. Research led by former postdoctoral scholar Lindsay Krall with Stanford nuclear security expert Rodney Ewing suggests the volume and chemistry of the waste they produce may pose safety challenges.

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Fact-checking a claim that plastics can help combat climate change

"I’m reminded of the common question, ‘Paper or plastic?’ The right answer is whatever you already have, so long as you reuse it," says Stanford professor Rob Jackson.

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The best stove for your health and the environment

TIME magazine feature covers the harmful health and climate effects of natural gas stoves and possible solutions based on a study led by Rob Jackson's research group.

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What should Southern Californians expect this fire season?

"We're starting the season in a severe drought heading into the warm part of the year, and we know that the kinds of severe heat waves that have really amplified fire risk in recent years are much more likely now than they were previously in California's history," says Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh. 

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Innovative fish farms aim to feed the planet

"Farming finfish on an industrial scale is like farming livestock on land on an industrial scale,” says Rosamond L. Naylor, who directs Stanford's Center on Food Security and the Environment. “There are ways to minimize risks, but they are costly, and not everyone is taking the steps they should be taking.”

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Gas stoves pollute homes, but what about fireplaces?

While gas fireplaces, furnaces, and hot water heaters all burn and leak methane, and are thus a concern from a climate perspective, Stanford's Eric Lebel and Rob Jackson say there's less of a worry than with gas stoves from a health perspective.

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To find alien life, scientists are unlocking mysteries of Saturn moon Titan

After modeling Titan's landscape, researchers led by Stanford geologist Mathieu Lapôtre found the moon exhibits a special type of sedimentary process called sintering, which means neighboring grains smash together and fuse into a bigger, stronger piece that's less destructible by wind.

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Life on Europa? Jupiter's moon may have the right ingredients

According to Stanford geophysicist Dustin Schroeder's new research, similarities between Jupiter's moon Europa and Greenland suggest Europa might be able to sustain life. 

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The energy requirements of a good life are surprisingly low

“People in countries like the U.S. are starting to ask what all this extra stuff filling our lives gets us. The answer appears to be very little, perhaps nothing," says Rob Jackson on excessive energy use levels around the world. 

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