Stanford University

Media Mentions

Jordan’s endless transition

Jordan isn’t just running a budget deficit; it is also running a water deficit. The Jordan Water Project, led by Stanford hydrologist Steve Gorelick, estimated that rainfall in the country could decrease by 30 percent by the end of the century.

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Prescribed burn associations are one answer to California’s megafires

Rebecca Miller, a PhD student in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, found that bureaucratic hurdles contribute to a lack of burning, as do public perceptions about fire.

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This is the worst fire season the American West has ever seen

Catastrophic blazes this year present an unprecedented threat to health and property. Stanford's Marshall Burke, Sam Heft-Neal and Michael Wara estimate that poor air quality from this year’s wildfires will kill thousands of people in California alone.

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Dry days ahead for California this year and beyond, experts say

“The addition of more 'fire ready' days have stemmed from just a one degree rise in global temperatures, and have resulted in some of the worst wildfires in history,” says Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh.

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The ocean-land connection of droughts

A study by Julio Herrera-Estrada and Noah Diffenbaugh reveals that landfalling droughts, which develop over the ocean and end up on land, are significantly larger and more intense than droughts that develop over land, and are linked to large weather patterns over the ocean. 

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Weather impacts your mental health

Research led by Marshall Burke of Stanford Earth found a link between hotter than average temperatures and increased suicide rates.

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Future Tucson will likely deal with more days of extreme heat

“If land loses water, it tends to warm up much more quickly. If all the water is gone, there are no mechanisms to cool down,” said Salvatore Pascale, a research scientist in Earth system science.

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Climate Is Taking On a Growing Role for Voters, Research Suggests

Stanford political scientist Jon Krosnick discusses the rising number of Americans who feel passionately about climate change.

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Study: Marin to experience worst traffic from sea rise

“It’s important to keep in mind that this is a regional problem, we need regional solutions,” said Jenny Suckale. “You can’t do it piece by piece.”

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Increasing sugarcane production for ethanol detrimental for India: Study

The current level of sugarcane production in India is sufficient to supply the amount of ethanol needed to meet E20 by 2030 if ethanol comes entirely from sugarcane juice, according to new research by Ju Young Lee, Steve Gorelick, Roz Naylor and Anjuli Jain Figueroa.

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Sea level rise to choke Bay Area traffic as far away as Santa Rosa, Napa

“It’s the road network that really is the key,” said Indraneel Kasmalkar, lead author of a new study with Jenny Suckale analyzing how coastal flooding impacts commute delays.

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With Covid-19, a seismic quiet like no other

Stanford researchers contributed to a study that found that the coronavirus shutdowns led to “the longest and most coherent global seismic noise reduction in recorded history.”

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What does net zero emissions mean for Big Oil? Not what you'd think

"I have grave misgivings about gigaton-scale natural solutions," or forestry offsets, said Rob Jackson. "And gigaton-scale is the only thing that matters when we're talking about the coal and oil and natural gas industries."

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Global methane emissions rising due to oil and gas, agriculture

“There’s a lot policymakers and companies can do to cut methane emissions. But in most places around the world, we aren’t doing them,” said Stanford scientist Rob Jackson.

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Methane emissions hit all-time high, scientists say

Methane emissions have hit a record high, driven by coal mining, oil production, natural gas production, landfills and cattle and sheep ranching, according to research from the Global Carbon Project, an initiative led by Rob Jackson. 

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US oil and gas leaks drive global methane emissions spike

"There's a hint that we might be able to reach peak carbon dioxide emissions very soon. But we don't appear to be even close to peak methane," said environmental scientist Rob Jackson.

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