Stanford University

Media Mentions

2020's worst environmental disasters, and how climate change played a role

"We're in a 'once in our history' experiment observing the succession of these forests. They're growing back in a new climate. It's yet to be seen how that unfolds," said climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh.

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How Russia wins the climate crisis

Marshall Burke projects that over the next 80 years, per capita G.D.P. in the United States will drop by 36 percent compared to what it would be in a nonwarming world, even as per capita G.D.P. in Russia will quadruple.

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The pandemic led to a record drop in carbon emissions

“I think it’s likely the biggest [drop in emissions] ever,” said Stanford's Rob Jackson. “That’s the equivalent of taking about 500 million cars off the world’s roads for a year.”

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The Marshall Islands could be wiped out by climate change

E-IPER PhD candidate Caroline Ferguson co-authored an op-ed about the challenges faced by residents of the Marshall Islands, a nation that stretches across more than a million square miles of Pacific Ocean.

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Kids, toxic smoke and inequality

Smoke pollution is beginning to reverse California's recent air quality gains, Stanford's Marshall Burke explains. His own personal experience shows how inequitable the impact of wildfire smoke pollution can be.

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What is the monetary cost of climate change?

Stanford environmental economist Marshall Burke discusses the cost of ignoring climate change with "The Daily Show" correspondent Dulcé Sloan.

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Is California heading for a multi-year drought? The odds aren't in our favor

What happens with La Niña heavily determines what the water year will look like, said Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh. "It's not just bad luck. There are configurations that tend to tip the odds towards more dry conditions,” he said.

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How do we know what's deep inside Earth?

“I think the mid-upper mantle would be gorgeous, because it would be olivine green, like 60 percent, and it would also have garnets, these beautiful red cubic minerals,” says Stanford mineral physicist Wendy Mao.

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Wildfire smoke is poisoning California's kids. Some pay a higher price.

Marshall Burke has found that, across California, as the number of smoke days has risen, it has begun to reverse gains the state had made in cleaning up its air from conventional sources of pollution. 

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Harsh droughts can actually start over oceans

“It’s not an obvious thing to wrap your head around. It’s a little counterintuitive to think about droughts over the ocean, because it’s wet,” Julio Herrera Estrada said about recent research co-authored with Noah Diffenbaugh.

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Look up: Helicopter will dangle electromagnet array over valley this week

Research led by Rosemary Knight uses a spider web-shaped device hanging from a helicopter to map underground water supplies.

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Climate change briefs: Death by heat on land and at sea

Kelp can mitigate ocean acidification but is it capable of lasting climate change? Researchers found the advantages minimal, as Heidi Hirsh commented, "one of the main takeaways for me is the limitation of the potential benefits from kelp productivity."

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Phytoplankton remain surprisingly active underneath Arctic sea ice

“There was a long-standing assumption that what was happening under the sea ice in the water column was almost ‘on pause’ during the polar night and before seasonal sea ice retreat, which is apparently not the case,” said Mathieu Ardyna.

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Where Europa's water lives

The plumes seen erupting from Jupiter's moon Europa might be fed by water trapped in the world's crust, according to a new study led by Stanford Earth postdoctoral researcher Gregor Steinbrügge.

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Europa's plumes may not originate from subsurface ocean

“We developed a way that a water pocket can move laterally – and that’s very important,” said Stanford geophysicist Gregor Steinbrügge. “It can move along thermal gradients, from cold to warm, and not only in the down direction as pulled by gravity.”

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As Cape Town races to save water, risk of 'Day Zero' drought seen rising

“In the worst-case scenario, events like the ‘Day Zero’ drought may become about 100 times more likely than they were in the early 20th-century world,” said Salvatore Pascale, a research scientist in Earth system science. 

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