Stanford University

Media Mentions

Scientists have found yet another way that climate change is making itself worse

Rob Jackson comments on troubling new findings that drought can have lasting "legacy" effects on trees that linger long after water shortages are over.

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How can we keep track of Earth's invisible water?

This week's episode of Generation Anthropocene goes on a deep dive into some of the planet's more mysterious water sources.

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Top five conversations about Earth in the age of humans

The Generation Anthropocene podcast brings you stories from the front lines of Earth science, history and philosophy.

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Stanford researchers find mental health prescription: Nature

A new study by E-IPER graduate student Gregory Bratman finds that walking in nature yields measurable mental benefits and may reduce risk of depression.

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Your Brain, the Environment and Our Decisions

By adapting neuroeconomics to environmental applications, Nik Sawe’s research explores how people process information while they are making environmental decisions.

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Ancient asteroid impacts boiled Earth's oceans for a whole year

A new study by Don Lowe suggests that Earth's oceans boiled for whole year when two asteroids measuring 30 and 60 miles across hit the Earth about 3.29 and 3.23 billion years ago.

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Fracking chemicals found in Pennsylvania drinking water

Rob Jackson says the integrity of wells is the key to safeguarding water quality, and that reports of fracking chemicals found in drinking water is usually due to poor cementing or other problems with well casings.

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How satellites can monitor California’s underground water

Rosemary Knight was among the first scientists to use InSAR technology to measure changes in groundwater levels from space. The technique could play a bigger role in groundwater monitoring in California as the state enters its fourth year of drought.

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Stronger quakes could strike other segments of Nepal fault

Simon Klemperer says a fault in Nepal that has been building stress since 1505 is primed to rupture at any moment, triggering an earthquake even bigger than the one that devastated the country on April 25.

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Weather underground

Stanford Earth alumni Katie Keranen and Justin Rubinstein are at the forefront of investigations of induced earthquakes in Oklahoma.

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California’s Catalina Island will sink into sea

New research by Chris Castillo suggests Catalina Island is sinking into the ocean and in a geologically short amount of time will dip beneath the waves.

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'New normal’: Scientists predict less rain from here on out

Recent studies by Noah Diffenbaugh and Daniel Swain have linked California's current dry conditions to climate change, and suggest droughts will be much more common in the future. 

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Know your oil

Prof. Adam Brandt is co-author of the Global Oil-Climate Index that allows comparison of climate impacts associated with a broad range of oil resources such as heavy oils, oil sands and tight oil.  Brandt collaborated with colleagues from the Carnegie Endowment's Energy and Climate Program and the University of Calgary to develop the first-of-its-kind index.

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Tons of 'ugly' fruits and veggies thrown away

The million tons of fruits and vegetables that are tossed out globally each year because they don't meet cosmetic standards or conform to conventional shapes is a tremendous waste of resources, writes PhD student Anna Lee. 

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Science communication as a “responsibility”

Noah Diffenbaugh says that because his research group is federally funded, he feels a responsibility to communicate about his work with the public. As a citizen, he also feels a responsibility about contributing to the public dialogue about climate change.

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Major atmospheric river to soak NorCal later this week

As seems to have become the theme over the past few years, an intense precipitation event now appears likely to immediately follow an extraordinary dry spell across Northern California

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