Stanford University

Media Mentions

What will the Green New Deal cost Americans?

An op-ed written by Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson that notes the financial toll of climate change already being experienced today is cited in a conversation about the cost of the proposed Green New Deal. 

Navigate to What will the Green New Deal cost Americans?

Deadly earthquake traveled at 'supersonic' speeds

An earthquake in Indonesia offered a detailed look at supershear, which can create the geologic version of a sonic boom. Stanford Earth's Eric Dunham says the event may help researchers better understand super-fast quakes.

Navigate to Deadly earthquake traveled at 'supersonic' speeds

Columbia Gas fined $75,000 for 2016 pipeline pressure spike

Commenting on a two-year lag between a 27-minute spike in pressure in gas pipes and the fine over the incident, Stanford professor Rob Jackson said any kind of overpressurization for that long is worrisome.

Navigate to Columbia Gas fined $75,000 for 2016 pipeline pressure spike

Economic growth and combatting climate change

“It’s absolutely the case that emissions and growth can be decoupled,” says Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke, whose research has shown the economic benefits of mitigation will be much larger than previously believed. 

Navigate to Economic growth and combatting climate change

Alum discusses new geophysical methods to monitor groundwater resources

Stanford Earth alumna Marine Denolle, who earned a Ph.D. under Greg Beroza in 2013, led a discussion about her research as an Earth and planetary sciences assistant professor at Harvard University.

Navigate to Alum discusses new geophysical methods to monitor groundwater resources

The Argo evolution

Shannon Switzer Swanson, a PhD student in E-IPER, and Grace Greenwald, an undergraduate studying biology and creative writing, report on how floating robots may change our understanding of the global carbon cycle.

Navigate to The Argo evolution

Will climate change tamp down wildfire-fanning Santa Ana winds?

“I don’t see a sufficient reduction of winds to override the wildfire risks from warming,” says Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh. “It’s clear that the warming itself has already substantially increased wildfire risk.”

Navigate to Will climate change tamp down wildfire-fanning Santa Ana winds?

New measurements show Sierra snow levels at long-term average

“We’re now in a climate where what used to be average appears to be a lot. That tells us something about what we've been dealing with recently in California,” says Noah Diffenbaugh of Stanford Earth.

Navigate to New measurements show Sierra snow levels at long-term average

Ancient Earth rock found on the moon

What may be the oldest-known Earth rock has turned up in a surprising place: the moon. Stanford geophysicist Norm Sleep explains why the moon is a good place to look for ancient Earth rocks.

Navigate to Ancient Earth rock found on the moon

Economic reasons for a Green New Deal

"I’ve spent two decades documenting the evidence and effects of climate change," writes Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson. "Hearing talk of a Green New Deal, I feel excitement and, perhaps surprisingly, dread."

Navigate to Economic reasons for a Green New Deal

Oil put L.A. on the map. It may have exaggerated the city's quake risk too

Stanford geophysicist Jenny Suckale comments on new research suggesting oil extraction may have caused nearly all of the moderate earthquakes that struck the Los Angeles Basin in the first half of the 20th century.

Navigate to Oil put L.A. on the map. It may have exaggerated the city's quake risk too

To curb climate change, we have to suck carbon from the sky. But how?

The first step in improved land management is to halt practices that require carbon-removal in the first place. "Dealing with tropical deforestation is huge, huge, huge," says Katharine Mach of Stanford Earth.

Navigate to To curb climate change, we have to suck carbon from the sky. But how?

Are we living through climate change's worst-case scenario?

Many economists expect carbon emissions to drop in the next few decades. But maybe they won’t. Are we on the worst-case scenario for climate change? “We’re actually a lot closer than we should be," says Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson.

Navigate to Are we living through climate change's worst-case scenario?

Carbon emissions rise but could slide in 2019

For the first time in four years U.S. carbon emissions increased, mostly because a booming economy used more energy resources, even with a shift toward renewable energy and natural gas. Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson discusses whether a booming economy and rising emissions can decouple.

Navigate to Carbon emissions rise but could slide in 2019

U.S. greenhouse gas emissions spike couldn't happen at a worse time

“We have lost momentum. There’s no question,” Rob Jackson, a Stanford University professor who studies emissions trends, said of both U.S. and global efforts to steer the world toward a more sustainable future.

Navigate to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions spike couldn't happen at a worse time

U.S. emissions soared in 2018, reversing years of progress

A series of reports from international bodies, including one led by Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson, found in late 2018 that nations around the world have reversed course in reducing emissions.

Navigate to U.S. emissions soared in 2018, reversing years of progress
maillinkedindouble carrot leftarrow leftdouble carrotplayerinstagramclosecarrotquotefacebooktwitterplusminussearchmenuarrowcloudclock