Stanford University

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U.S. carbon pollution surged in 2018, after years of stasis

"From 2014 through 2016, we saw emissions that were flat while the global economy grew," says Stanford Earth climate scientist Rob Jackson. "Now we're back to a much faster rate of increase."

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Can you explain science using only 1,000 common words?

Earth System Science PhD student Katerina Gonzales and colleagues found creative ways to discuss the warming of atmospheric rivers, or "sky long water things," for AGU's Up-Goer Five Challenge.

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California's droughts hurt fight against climate change. Study tells us why

Recent droughts across the West have squeezed hydroelectric facilities and hampered efforts to reduce greenhouse gas pollution, according to a new study from Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh and Julio Herrera-Estrada.

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Climate change-induced drought? What about drought-induced climate change?

One of the main ways California is experiencing the effects of climate change is through severe droughts. Now new research from Stanford Earth suggests those droughts are also contributing to climate change.

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The next climate frontier: Predicting a complex domino effect

“Reality is complex. In a changing climate, nothing is being affected all by itself,” says Stanford Earth's Katharine Mach, a co-author of the fourth National Climate Assessment released in November.

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Dry weather drives up energy emissions in the West

Research from Noah Diffenbaugh and Julio Herrera-Estrada finds drought-driven emissions accounted for around 10 percent of CO2 output from the power sector in several Western states between 2001 and 2015.

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How droughts boost air pollution

Droughts do more than just dry up our lawns, orchards, pastures and ski slopes. A Stanford study reveals a hidden impact of low water: worse air pollution, as we shift from hydropower to fossil fuels.

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Droughts drop hydropower output, raise emissions, study says

Droughts have long been known to place pressure on agriculture and water supplies, but they can also lead to increased carbon dioxide emissions, according to a study from Stanford Earth scientists.

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An unexpected side effect of drought: Higher carbon emissions

Low river flows in the western U.S. drastically hampered the amount of carbon-free electricity that could be produced by the thousands of hydroelectric power plants across the West, a study from Stanford Earth shows.

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The deep ocean spawned Earth's first complex organisms

Scientists have long wondered why the planet's first complex organisms emerged in the cold, dark depths of the ocean, where food and sun are in short supply. Stanford Earth's Erik Sperling and Tom Boag have an answer.

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The first large complex organisms evolved in the deep ocean

Stanford Earth's Tom Boag and Erik Sperling may have uncovered an important piece of the Ediacaran-Cambrian puzzle which could help piece together the missing links of the evolution of all life on Earth.

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Greenhouse gas emissions are rising, again

Rob Jackson of Stanford Earth talks about research he co-authored showing that use of energy from fossil-fuel sources is growing faster than renewable or low-carbon energy sources.

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Earth's first life-forms played it cool in deep ocean

People always ask why they’re here on Earth. A study by Stanford Earth's Tom Boag and Erik Sperling suggests it could be because the deep ocean stays the same temperature and our single-cell ancestors liked to keep things simple.

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Climate change will bring more strong El Niños

Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh comments on a new study that suggests rising temperatures will increase the frequency of strong El Niño events, which often bring pummeling rains across the state.

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The planet has seen sudden warming before. It wiped out almost everything.

In some ways, the planet's worst mass extinction, 250 million years ago, may parallel climate change today, according to a study co-authored by Stanford Earth's Jon Payne and Erik Sperling.

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When a killer climate catastrophe struck the world's oceans

A study co-authored by Jon Payne and Erik Sperling suggests the worst extinction in Earth’s history offers chilling predictions for the planet’s future – and for humanity’s efforts to keep climate doom at bay.

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