Stanford University

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Unusually hot and dry conditions have doubled worldwide

Scientists have warned that many regions around the world may see more hot, dry conditions as climate change reshapes the planet. Now, a study from Noah Diffenbaugh actually quantifies the risk.

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Very hot and very dry conditions have doubled worldwide

New research from Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh shows the chance of having years that are both extremely warm and extremely dry has doubled around the globe since 1931.

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Things are getting hotter across regions and seasons

A new Stanford study says hot and dry conditions will increasingly hit multiple regions at the same time – shrinking crop yields, destabilizing food prices and laying the groundwork for large wildfires.

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Wildfires more likely with hot/dry weather combo

Climate change has doubled the odds that a region will suffer the brutal combination of hot and dry weather at the same time, according to a study from Noah Diffenbaugh of Stanford Earth.  

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What American Samoan corals tell about El Niño’s history

New research by Rob Dunbar and Neil Tangri uses Samoan corals to show how temperature and salinity patterns in the equatorial Pacific changed in space and time over the last 500 years.

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Nature could suck up 21 percent of our greenhouse gas emissions

Stanford Earth's Katharine Mach argues that decarbonizing needs to come from many sources, ranging from fully biological to engineered.

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Part of the answer to climate change may be America's trees and dirt

“We need to pay attention to everything that’s happening across different landscapes,” says Stanford Earth's Katharine Mach. “So much of this is tied to the way we grow food.”

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U.S. could meet Paris emissions pledge with 'natural climate solutions'

Stanford Earth professor Sally Benson comments on a new study assessing the potential for reforestation, land-use changes and other ecosystem-based approaches to help mitigate climate change.

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Deadliest wildfire in California's history portends what's to come

Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh explains the connections between climate change and wildfire risk – and why failure to recognize that risk is extremely dangerous for California.

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"The new abnormal": Wildfires and climate change

Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh explains how human activity is making wildfires more frequent and more severe as a guest on NPR's 1A.

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Add climate change to the list of things blockchain is supposed to solve

Stanford Earth's Katharine Mach says there’s a danger in assuming blockchain, the technology behind Bitcoin, will be a miracle cure for climate change. "It's essentially can-kicking ethics."

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‘Himalayan viagra’ under threat from climate change

A study co-authored by Stanford Earth professor Eric Lambin looks into how global warming has played a role in the survival of the fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis.

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The Tibetan caterpillar fungus is in trouble

Research co-authored by Stanford Earth's Eric Lambin conclusively shows what others have suspected: A precious fungus is disappearing, as a result of a double whammy of overharvesting and warming weather.

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There may be troves of liquid water hiding in Greenland's ice

A first-of-its-kind analysis from Stanford Earth researchers including Dustin Schroeder has revealed a surprising amount of liquid water encased in solid ice inside Greenland’s Store Glacier. 

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California farms feed the U.S., but their land is sinking

The Central Valley is one the main food suppliers in the U.S., but it now faces a host of environmental concerns. Research from Stanford Earth shows over-pumping aquifers can release toxic arsenic.

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For some poor countries, climate science comes too late

Stanford Earth's Katharine Mach explains the climate data gap, which allows scientists to say to say much more specifically how climate change will play out in Europe and North America compared to other places.

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