Stanford University

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The 'great dying': Rapid warming caused largest extinction event ever

A study co-authored by Erik Sperling and Jon Payne shows rapid global warming caused the largest extinction event in the Earth’s history, which wiped out the vast majority of marine and terrestrial animals on the planet.

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Everyday people are feeling the effects of climate change

Stanford University scientist Rob Jackson says everyday people across the U.S. have started to feel the impacts of climate change, citing natural disasters like wildfires as well as rising sea levels. 

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World hits another alarming carbon emissions mark

The Global Carbon Project, an organization led by Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson, estimates that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel sources will hit a record high of more than 37 billion tons this year.

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Emissions of carbon dioxide into Earth's atmosphere reach record high

The record high of carbon emissions in 2018 was driven by a solid growth in coal use for the second year in a row, along with sustained growth in oil and gas use, according to new research co-authored by Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson.

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Why fossil fuel emissions are increasing – again

Driven by growing energy use, the world’s carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels continue to increase, placing the goals of the Paris climate agreement in jeopardy, according to a new Stanford-led analysis.

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Fight against greenhouse gases stalls as emissions soar to new record

Research from Rob Jackson and the Global Carbon Project shows that while many wealthy nations are turning to clean energy, they aren’t doing so quickly enough to make up for dirty coal plants.

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Carbon dioxide emissions are up again. What now, climate?

For three years the amount of atmospheric CO2 had leveled off. But it started to climb again in 2017, and research led by Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson shows it's is still rising.

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Global carbon emissions reached a record high in 2018

As nations assemble in Poland for climate talks, projections from Rob Jackson and the Global Carbon Project suggest there is no clear end in sight to the growth of humanity’s contribution to climate change.

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Greenhouse gas emissions accelerate like a 'speeding freight train' in 2018

Greenhouse gas emissions worldwide are growing at an accelerating pace this year, according to research from Stanford Earth professor Rob Jackson's Global Carbon Project.

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Carbon emissions are about to hit an all-time high, thanks to cars

A new report from Stanford Earth scientist Rob Jackson's Global Carbon Project puts a damper on hopes that emissions might soon start decreasing, as they must if catastrophic climate change is to be averted.

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Global emissions climb to record highs, reversing three years of declines

Demand for energy is fueling emissions spikes in the U.S. and in nations around the world, according to new research led by Stanford Earth professor Rob Jackson's Global Carbon Project.

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Unusually hot and dry conditions have doubled worldwide

Scientists have warned that many regions around the world may see more hot, dry conditions as climate change reshapes the planet. Now, a study from Noah Diffenbaugh actually quantifies the risk.

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Very hot and very dry conditions have doubled worldwide

New research from Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh shows the chance of having years that are both extremely warm and extremely dry has doubled around the globe since 1931.

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Things are getting hotter across regions and seasons

A new Stanford study says hot and dry conditions will increasingly hit multiple regions at the same time – shrinking crop yields, destabilizing food prices and laying the groundwork for large wildfires.

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Wildfires more likely with hot/dry weather combo

Climate change has doubled the odds that a region will suffer the brutal combination of hot and dry weather at the same time, according to a study from Noah Diffenbaugh of Stanford Earth.  

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What American Samoan corals tell about El Niño’s history

New research by Rob Dunbar and Neil Tangri uses Samoan corals to show how temperature and salinity patterns in the equatorial Pacific changed in space and time over the last 500 years.

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