Stanford University

Media Mentions

The West is going up in flames

Fires are raging from British Columbia to California, and the Administration's climate policies will make things worse, writes Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson.

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OK computer: How AI could help forecast quake aftershocks

Geophysics professor Gregory Beroza comments on new research aimed at using artificial intelligence to predict where aftershocks will strike.

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Facebook aims for fossil-free future

Stanford Earth's Adam Brandt describes challenges preventing local grids from supplying 100 percent renewables to facilities like Facebook's data centers.

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Help to shape policy with your science

Katharine Mach, a senior research scientist in Earth System Science, discusses working at the interface of science and policy.

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How will storm, rain affect Hawaii's Kilauea volcano?

Could heavy rainfall from Hurricane Lane put Hawaii's Kilauea volcano out for good? Probably not, explains Stanford Earth's Eric Dunham.

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Climate change has doubled the frequency of ocean heatwaves

Stanford’s Noah Diffenbaugh explains how the same kinds of extremes that we see on land can also happen in the ocean.

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Solar geoengineering may be our last resort for climate change

A new paper co-authored by Stanford's Marshall Burke suggests pumping sulfur dioxide into the air is unlikely to stave off crop damage from global warming.

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It's hot. But it may not be the new normal yet.

Stanford climate scientist Katharine Mach describes a shift from climate seeming like a distant issue for others, to a muggy, smoky reality that we live and breathe today.

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Tornadoes on the East Coast may be a sign of things to come

Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh explains why tornadoes are the kind of extreme event where scientists are least able to attribute the odds or characteristics of individual events to an influence of global warming.

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Will dimming the sun cool the planet and help crops?

Solar geoengineering would ease heat stress, but also block vital sunlight for plants, according to new research co-authored by Marshall Burke of Stanford Earth.

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Geoengineering won't save our crops

Using two volcanic eruptions as proxies for a geoengineering program, researchers including Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke found that using aerosols to cool the planet likely wouldn’t help crops.

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How engineering the climate could mess with our food

Scientists including Stanford's Marshall Burke looked at the effects of volcanic eruptions to determine that solar shading resulting from geoengineering would negatively affect crops.

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A volcano-inspired weapon to fix climate change is a terrible idea

In the fight against climate change, research co-authored by Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke suggests one proposed method of cooling the Earth is more like chemotherapy than cure.

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A plan to shoot tiny droplets into the sky wouldn't help crops

A new study co-authored by Marshall Burke suggests any boost in crop yield due to lower temperatures from geoengineering would be largely counteracted by dimmer sunlight.

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Dimming sunlight to slow global warming may harm crop yields

Spraying a veil of chemicals high above the Earth to slow global warming could harm crop yields, according to research by scientists including Stanford's Marshall Burke.

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Solar geoengineering can't save our food from climate change

Research co-authored by Marshall Burke of Stanford Earth shows scattering aerosols in the sky would cool the planet, but it would block crucial sunlight for plants.

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