Stanford University

Media Mentions

Venus is Earth's evil twin, and space agencies can't resist its pull

“There is growing realization within the exoplanet community that Venus is the best analogue in the Solar System for many of the rocky exoplanets we have found,” says geological sciences professor Laura Schaefer. Navigate to Venus is Earth's evil twin, and space agencies can't resist its pull

Thousands of Americans are expected to perish during future heat waves

Noah Diffenbaugh's research has found that, if carbon emissions keep increasing, much of the globe will experience "the permanent emergence of unprecedented summer heat" in the coming decades. Navigate to Thousands of Americans are expected to perish during future heat waves

Enormous plankton blooms fueled by vents deep in Earth's belly

A study co-authored by Stanford Earth's Kevin Arrigo and Mathieu Ardyna suggests the goings on in the deep ocean could play a bigger role with surface ecosystems than previously thought.

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Powerful deep-ocean vents fuel phytoplankton blooms off Antarctica

Recent ocean modeling has suggested hydrothermal vents play a key role in how nutrients move through the ocean column. A study from Kevin Arrigo and Mathieu Ardyna confirms model predictions with real observations. Navigate to Powerful deep-ocean vents fuel phytoplankton blooms off Antarctica

Hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor trigger huge phytoplankton blooms

Research by Stanford Earth's Kevin Arrigo and Mathieu Ardyna suggests hydrothermal vents on the seafloor may have a larger impact on life near the water's surface and on the global carbon cycle than once thought.

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Confronting climate change, Louisiana shifts from resilience to retreat

"There's an ad hoc retreat happening in the world around us. In the aftermath of Katrina for example, a lot of people didn't go back, properties were abandoned," says Stanford's Katharine Mach.

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Where will all the water go?

A hundred years ago, some California droughts were “hot” or “cool." There’s been a dramatic shift in the past couple of decades, though, as demonstrated in research led by Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh. Navigate to Where will all the water go?

Democrats conflate weather and climate change in 2020 bids

"Objective rigorous analysis shows that global warming has increased the odds of extreme precipitation events in this region of the world," says Stanford Earth climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh.

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Tornadoes and climate change: What does the science say?

Research by Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh and colleagues examined how the conditions needed for severe thunderstorms and tornadoes to develop are projected to change in climate models. 

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Fracking: Inside a BLM report and environmental impacts

Stanford geophysicist Mark Zoback explains some fracking basics, including what is and isn’t known about the technique's impact on the environment and how he believes fracking can be done responsibly.

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A Facebook first: Tech giant invests directly in a renewable energy project

Facebook has committed to reaching 100 percent renewables by 2020, and now it's investing in a solar project. But research from Sally Benson notes that doesn't necessarily equate to clean energy around the clock.

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Is climate change fueling tornadoes?

Research led by Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh projects that some of the environments conducive to severe weather will occur more often, but it's unclear if that means more tornadoes.

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The difference between '100% renewable' and '100% carbon-free'

Most companies haven’t fully explored the real emissions impact of their shift to renewables, says Stanford Earth professor Sally Benson. Navigate to The difference between '100% renewable' and '100% carbon-free'

The threat methane poses in the battle to reverse climate change

"If pollution were drops of blood, it's a lot easier to blot them from your fingertips than to clean them from a rug," says Stanford Earth's Rob Jackson in an interview about his research on converting methane to carbon dioxide.

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UN touts family farms as key to sustainable future

“Many of the people growing the food in this world right now are family farmers, and I think sometimes we forget that,” says Stanford Earth lecturer Liz Carlisle. Navigate to UN touts family farms as key to sustainable future

Extreme weather driven by climate change across U.S.

Global warming has already increased the odds of record hot and wet events happening in 75 percent of North America, says Stanford Earth professor Noah Diffenbaugh. Navigate to Extreme weather driven by climate change across U.S.
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