Stanford University

Media Mentions

Reflecting sun's rays would cause crops to fail

Research co-authored by Stanford's Marshall Burke shows a geoengineering method intended to combat climate change would hurt agriculture.

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Court gives advantage to tribes as supplies dry up

Philip Womble, a Stanford Earth PhD student, comments on research he led that shows new leverage for tribes in water disputes following a landmark court ruling.

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More fires, more floods in California's future

Research suggests the climate extremes of California's past five years are indicative of what the future will hold, says Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh.

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Climate change's looming mental health crisis

Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke describes evidence that people across socioeconomic strata and populations share a biological response to warmer temperatures.

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Searching for climate change fingerprints as wildfires worsen

Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh explains how scientists are working to find climate change fingerprints in individual extreme weather events.

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Global warming has contributed to wildfire intensity

The hotter the conditions, the more dried out the vegetation gets. That elevates the wildfire risk, explains Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh.

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Losing Earth: The decade we almost stopped climate change

Stanford Earth professor by courtesy Ken Caldeira asks new grad students to name the biggest fundamental breakthrough in climate physics since 1979. It's a trick question.

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July was the hottest month in Reno in 125 years of records

Noah Diffenbaugh of Stanford Earth explains the connection between climate change and record-setting temperatures across much of the globe.

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How much did climate change fuel that hellish July?

Noah Diffenbaugh of Stanford Earth comments on the role of climate change in recent record-breaking heat waves.

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California wildfires destroy hundreds of structures

On ABC's “Start Here” podcast, Stanford's Noah Diffenbaugh discusses reasons why recent wildfires have been causing more damage.

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'Global greening' sounds good. In the long run, it's terrible.

Rising CO2 levels are making the world greener. But research including a study co-authored by Marshall Burke and David Lobell of Stanford Earth suggests that’s nothing to celebrate. 

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Science says: Record heat, fires worsened by climate change

Stanford Earth’s Noah Diffenbaugh describes evidence that global warming has “put a thumb on the scales,” upping odds of severe heat and heavy rainfall.

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Bangladeshi pregnant women carry higher blood lead

Research led by E-IPER PhD student Jenna Forsyth shows Bangladeshi pregnant women are exposed to multiple possible sources of lead from the environment and food sources.

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What we know about the link between climate change and suicide rates

A new study led by Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke sheds light on the relationship between above-average temperatures and rising suicide rates.

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Will climate change actually increase suicide rates?

The idea that heat directly causes suicide, put forth in new research led by Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke, is a new and monumental claim. 

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Hotter months harm mental health and increase suicides

Researchers examined suicide and weather data from every county and municipality in the U.S. and Mexico, and found suicide rates go up in unusually warm months.

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