Stanford University

Media Mentions

Climate simulations are mostly accurate, study finds

“Even without knowing what the current level of greenhouse gas concentrations would be, the climate models predicted the evolution of global temperature quite well,” says Noah Diffenbaugh. “We have one planet Earth, so we can’t conduct controlled experiments on the actual climate system."

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Aerial scans help bust California's worst methane leakers

The air above Earth – especially above California – might have way more methane in it than anyone thought. And that could be good news. "Most of the emissions come from a small fraction of sources,” says Stanford Earth's Adam Brandt. 

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Rich Californians shell out $30,000 to avoid blackout pain

“This idea that you can just be off the grid, we are hearing that more and more,” Sally Benson says about backup power sources. Under some circumstances, the systems may do more environmental harm than good.

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Drones reveal earthquake hazards hidden in the abyss

Stanford Earth's Paul Segall comments on a new, cheaper way to track crustal movements on the ocean floor. The method would replace expensive ships with ocean-going drones.

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Opinion: Is banning natural gas an ‘antidote to climate change’?

As governments in California increasingly consider limiting new residential natural gas connections, it is important to question whether banning natural gas is an “antidote to climate change,” writes Anthony Kovscek.

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No more fire in the kitchen: Cities are banning natural gas in homes to save the planet

“Every house, every high-rise that’s built with gas, may be in place for decades. We’re establishing infrastructure that may be in place for 50 years,” says Rob Jackson.  

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How do submarine and terrestrial canyons compare?

As detailed in a new study published in Geology, Stephen Dobbs and his collaborators used open-source multibeam sonar data, along with topographic data, to compare land and underwater canyons. 

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PG&E outages prompt clean energy programs to focus on solar, batteries

“One of the ways to sort of insulate yourself better from public safety power shut-offs is to have some local storage so that you can segregate your electrical grid a little bit so that it’s more of a microgrid,” says Tony Kovscek. 

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What scientists say we should do to prevent wildfire disasters

Many experts believe recent disasters represent a new era — one in which major wildfires that threaten people and their homes are a regular fixture in our lives. Chris Field talks about how the scientific community is thinking about wildfires.

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Research roundup: Rice and arsenic, microaggressions in medicine and frog cytoplasm reorganizing

Rice yields will decrease by 40 percent by 2100 and will contain twice as much arsenic as rice today, according to new research by Scott Fendorf. 

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Trump can begin steps to pull US out of Paris climate deal

For more than two years President Donald Trump has talked about pulling out of the landmark Paris climate agreement. Rob Jackson, chair of the Global Carbon Project that tracks carbon emissions worldwide, speaks about this commitment.

 

 

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Opinion: A scary year for climate change

Rob Jackson says total global carbon dioxide emissions are rising again in 2019, and other scientists’ warnings about climate change have intensified over the past 12 months. Will world leaders finally listen?

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NSF shakes up its earthquake research

NSF is forcing competition while mandating that a single contractor manage its two large facilities for studying Earth’s shape and vibration. This comes as a surprise, “but it’s not dire news. In a way, I kind of welcome it,” says Greg Beroza.

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AP fact check: Trump’s twisted reality on guns, environment

Rob Jackson speaks on the various carbon emission goals set by the U.S., Britain, and the European Union.

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Geophysicist Bill Ellsworth on future earthquakes & looking back at Loma Prieta

“They may be seismically silent, but we know they’re out there,” Bill Ellsworth tells KGO 810 radio about faults in the Bay Area.

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How Loma Prieta changed earthquake science

"Loma Prieta was in many ways a transformative earthquake," says Bill Ellsworth about the 1989 magnitude 6.9 quake that originated in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

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