Stanford University

Media Mentions

How climate change will affect your health

"As economic conditions worsen, that might also worsen mental health," Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke explains. There also might be "a plausible biological linkage between temperature, thermal regulation and how the brain regulates its own emotion."

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Who drew it? Trump asks of dire climate report

Stanford's Katharine Mach is mentioned as one of 91 leading scientists from 40 countries who examined more than 6,000 scientific studies for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's latest report .

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‘Catastrophic’ mental health changes tied to climate change

Marshall Burke's recent study on the connection between suicide rates and temperature is cited in the context of additional research that exposure to heat, on average, worsens mental health outcomes.

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How to understand the UN's dire new climate report

“We’ve already seen dangerous interference," explains Stanford Earth's Chris Field. "Now the question is, How do we deal as effectively as we can with that?”

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The future of the world is on the line, and our chance to fix it is now

Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh describes his research showing that, relative to the eventual economic damage of not acting aggressively enough to protect the planet in the future, it would cost much less to make changes now.

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Harvey, Florence, and the climate change connection

Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh explains how scientists are able to connect the dots between hurricanes and climate change more directly now than ever before.

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A Stanford, un chasseur de climats

Earth System Science professor Rob Dunbar speaks with French publication Le Temps about his work studying the oceans, climate, marine biology, and interactions between human activities and the environment.

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New research predicts fewer earthquakes in Kansas

New research out of Stanford Earth shows that limiting wastewater injection is helping to prevent man-made earthquakes in Kansas and Oklahoma.

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New study finds incredibly high carbon pollution costs

Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke co-authored an influential study detailing the relationship between a country's average temperature and its per capita GDP.

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The food warriors

"Figuring out a way to intensify agriculture on a global scale without the use of toxic pesticides remains a major challenge for humanity,” says Stanford Earth professor Roz Naylor.

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This enigmatic blob was once of Earth's earliest animals

Stanford Earth microbiologist Paula Welander comments on new research that suggests the ancient life form Dickinsonia is among the earliest animal life yet found - predating the Cambrian explosion.

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California’s plan to store water underground could risk contamination

Earth System Science professor Scott Fendorf discusses the prevalence and potential contamination of chromium in California's groundwater in light of ongoing policy discussions.

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Governors and mayors pledge more emissions cuts

"Until the United States can join with the international community to really push the most organized end of the agenda, it's going to be really hard to not fall short," Stanford Earth's Chris Field says.

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EU plan to rely on wood for energy will increase emissions

A study co-authored by Eric Lambin, a professor of Earth system science, finds greenhouse gases and deforestation would increase due to a new European directive to reduce emissions by 2030.

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Big Oil's black mark on California's climate record

Stanford Earth professor Rob Jackson comments on oil and gas activity found in freshwater aquifers and questions the wisdom of continuing policies from the 1950s, when many wells were drilled. 

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Hot summer days cause suicide rate to rise

Stanford Earth professor Marshall Burke discusses his work to determine just how connected suicide and excessively hot temperatures are.

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