Stanford University

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Rising temperatures linked to increasing suicide rates

Unmitigated climate change could result in tens of thousands more suicides in the U.S. and Mexico by 2050, according to new research led by Marshall Burke.

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As heat rises, so do suicides, Stanford study finds

Scientists led by Marshall Burke amassed decades of death records and localized temperature records to show that hotter temperatures are raising the risk of suicide.

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Global warming linked to higher suicide rates across North America

Research led by Marshall Burke found a 1-degree Celsius rise corresponded to a 1.4 percent increase in suicides. Even warmer-than-usual winters showed the trend.

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Rising heat linked to suicide spikes in U.S. and Mexico

A hotter planet could lead to tens of thousands more suicides by 2050 in the U.S. and Mexico, unless global warming is curbed, a study led by Marshall Burke finds.

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Study: Hot temperatures linked to increase in suicides

Global warming could lead to thousands of suicides over the next few decades, according to a study led by Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke.

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Global warming will cause more people to die by suicide: study

Researchers led by Marshall Burke found a roughly linear relationship between temperature and suicide. Suicide rates go down in cooler months, and up in cooler ones.

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Global warming is making more people kill themselves: study

Stanford scientists have identified a connection between climate change and mental health, suggesting abnormally hot temperatures prompt more suicides.

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Climate change could drive additional suicides in North America

Scientists led by Marshall Burke of Stanford Earth found that suicides, as well as depressive language on Twitter, rise as temperatures do.

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Study ties warming temperatures to rising suicide risk

Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke describes his research finding a consistent relationship between warmer temperatures and higher suicide risk in the U.S. and Mexico.

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Climate change may cause more U.S. suicides

Research led by Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke shows climate change may cause 26,000 more suicides in the United States by 2050.

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Rising temperatures linked to increased suicide rates

Scientists led by Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke warn the impact of climate change may be as large as economic recessions, which are known to increase self-harm.

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Climate change has come to your neighborhood

Noah Diffenbaugh of Stanford Earth explains why current warming trends are likely to hurt wine production in California, where the highest quality grapes grow in a narrow climate envelope.

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The dark side of California's mega farms

The floor of the Central Valley is slumping, and there is arsenic in the tap water. Now research from Stanford Earth suggests the two problems are connected. 

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The Giants of California: How Redwoods and Whales Got So Big

Will Gearty, a PhD student in Jonathan Payne's lab, discusses his work exploring the factors that affect the body size of aquatic mammals.

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How more carbon dioxide could lead to more disease

More CO2 in the air would lead to a decrease in the nutritional content of many foods, a new study finds. Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke and David Lobell are co-authors.

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Universities encouraging scientists to avoid air travel

Arvind Ravikumar, postdoctoral scholar of energy resources engineering, describes traveling to an American Geophysical Union meeting by train - a mode that more researchers are choosing to avoid carbon emissions from air travel. 

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