Stanford University

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Global warming makes world's rich richer and poor poorer

Soaring temperatures have enriched cooler, wealthier countries while dragging down economic growth in warmer nations, according to a new study by Marshall Burke and Noah Diffenbaugh.

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Water use is literally sinking the Central Valley

Stanford Earth geophysicist Rosemary Knight discusses how her recent research integrating two types of remote sensing data could help water managers in California's Central Valley.

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Here's what the world will look like once we solve climate change

What will life be like after we've solved climate change? Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh and Chris Field comment. "Every single proposed solution will simultaneously improve life and decrease carbon emissions."

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Climate change has increased global inequality. It will only get worse

Scientists have long predicted that warmer temperatures caused by climate change will have the biggest impact on the world’s poorest, most vulnerable people. New research indicates that’s already happened.

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Global warming may boost economic inequality

Stanford researchers say warmer temperatures are widening the chasm separating richer and poorer countries, effectively boosting the economies of many wealthy polluters while dampening growth in much of the developing world. 

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Global inequality is decreasing, but climate change is slowing progress

New research by Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke and Noah Diffenbaugh shows that global warming has already imposed an economic penalty on many countries.

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Climate change makes poor countries poorer, widening global inequality

Climate change is having a serious impact on economic growth across the world – and it's worse for poor countries that already had a lot of catching up to do, according to a new study.

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Global wealth gap would be smaller today without climate change

Climate change creates winners and losers. Norway is among the winners; Nigeria among the losers. Those are the stark findings of a peer-reviewed paper by Stanford professors Marshall Burke and Noah Diffenbaugh.

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A climate change solution slowly gains ground

Of the 65 million tons of carbon dioxide that is pumped underground in the United States every year, about 60 million tons is for enhanced oil recovery, says Stanford Earth's Sally Benson.

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Scientists uncover California's hidden earthquakes

Stanford geophysicist Greg Beroza comments on a new study that adds nearly two million earthquakes to the catalogue of total seismic events in Southern California over the past decade. 

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The Central Valley is sinking as farmers drill for water. It can be saved

Research by Rosemary Knight shows that unless action is taken, parts of the Central Valley will sink more than 13 feet over the next 20 years. Stopping it will require strategic replenishment of shrinking aquifers.

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San Francisco should look to nature to respond to sea-level rise

"Ecosystem-based adaptation needs to be prioritized as the cheapest, most effective and most resilient strategy to protect the city from the quickly worsening impacts of climate change," Stanford Earth undergraduate student Jacqueline Vogel writes in an op-ed.

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Climate research needs to help communities plan for the future

A Rutgers climate scientist highlights former Stanford Earth dean Pam Matson as a pioneer in recognizing "stakeholders outside of academia as critical partners throughout the research process."

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We can't rely solely on renewable energy yet

Making it cheaper for businesses to invest in carbon capture and storage is the best way to immediately reduce fossil fuel emissions, writes Stanford Earth professor and Precourt Institute co-director Sally Benson.

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Pretty soon we'll have to stop blaming China for global carbon emissions

“No one country can stabilize the global temperature just by stabilizing its emissions,” says Stanford Earth professor Noah Diffenbaugh. "This is why climate policy presents some clear challenges."

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Largest delta plain in Earth's history discovered in Arctic

"The Triassic delta plain system build across this shelf region is truly vast," says Stanford Earth professor Elizabeth Miller, commenting on a new study of deposits now located in the Barents Sea.

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