Stanford University

Media Mentions

Scientists concerned by 'record high' global methane emissions

Worldwide emissions of methane have hit the “highest levels on record”, according to the latest update to the Global Methane Budget from the Global Carbon Project, an initiative chaired by Stanford's Rob Jackson.

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Global methane levels soar to record high

Livestock farming and oil and gas production are clearly two engines powering rising methane emissions, says Earth system science professor Rob Jackson.

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Phytoplankton enhance Arctic Ocean's ability to soak up carbon dioxide

Research co-authored by Kevin Arrigo of Stanford Earth shows increased phytoplankton biomass is driving a rise in net primary production in the Arctic Ocean, or how fast plants and algae convert sunlight and carbon dioxide into nutrients.

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Cow Burps, Leaky Pipelines Put Earth on High-End Warming Track

Global emissions of methane rose by 9 percent in the decade through 2017, according to a study from the Global Carbon Project, which is led by Rob Jackson.

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Methane emissions have gone up everywhere except Europe

"There are a lot policymakers and companies can do to cut methane emissions. But in most places around the world, we aren't doing them," said Rob Jackson.

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Livestock farming and fossil fuels could drive 4C global heat rise

“CO2 is still the beast to slay but warming from methane is the next most important," said Stanford professor Rob Jackson.

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Methane levels have hit a scary new high, two studies say

“There are a billion and a half more people on Earth than there were in 2000,” said Rob Jackson. “Emissions have gone up because of extra mouths to feed.”

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Global methane emissions reach a record high

“There’s a hint that we might be able to reach peak carbon dioxide emissions very soon. But we don’t appear to be even close to peak methane,” said Stanford professor Rob Jackson.

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Blooms of phytoplankton on the rise in Arctic Ocean

The growing influence of phytoplankton biomass on primary production may represent a “significant regime shift” for the Arctic, said senior study author Kevin Arrigo of Stanford Earth.

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2020 is our last, best chance to save the planet

“We’ve run out of time to build new things in old ways,” said Stanford professor Rob Jackson. What we do now will define the fate of the planet – and human life on it – for decades.

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Carbon levels fell with the virus. Now they're surging back

"We expected emissions to increase when lockdowns ease and the economy picks up. What's striking is how fast it is happening," Rob Jackson said.

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A war against climate science, waged by Washington’s rank and file

Noah Diffenbaugh discusses his experience corresponding with Energy Department officials about climate science language used in his federally funded research.

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How AI, satellites could help more accurately predict wildfires

Krishna Rao and Alexandra Konings discuss how new research using satellite images and artificial intelligence could help predict deadly wildfires and save lives.

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As wildfire season approaches, AI could pinpoint risky regions using satellite imagery

Scientists led by Stanford Earth's Alexandra Konings have found a way to track and predict dry, at-risk areas using machine learning and satellite imagery. Navigate to As wildfire season approaches, AI could pinpoint risky regions using satellite imagery

There's a lot less pollution but climate change is still getting worse

 A study co-authored by Rob Jackson found that between January and April of 2020, global carbon emissions fell by 17 percent compared to daily levels in 2019. 

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