Stanford University

Media Mentions

Foreshocks debunked as earthquake predictor

New data on the 1999 disaster in Izmit, Turkey shows little quakes preceding the big one were unrelated and detecting foreshocks won't help predict major quakes. Bill Ellsworth of Stanford Earth led the research.

Navigate to Foreshocks debunked as earthquake predictor

Another danger from overpumping groundwater: Arsenic

Geophysics professor Rosemary Knight comments on a study she co-authored showing that sinking land caused by intensive groundwater pumping in California is releasing trapped arsenic, a known carcinogen.

Navigate to Another danger from overpumping groundwater: Arsenic

We still don't know how to predict big quakes

Stanford Earth geophysicist William Ellsworth discusses new research that dampens hopes of predicting big earthquakes by detecting foreshocks, and the importance of preparation. 

Navigate to We still don't know how to predict big quakes

Can foreshocks predict larger earthquakes?

Stanford Earth geophysicist Bill Ellsworth explains his research showing that tremors preceding a 1999 earthquake in Turkey were no different than ordinary earthquakes - not warnings of the bigger quake to come.

Navigate to Can foreshocks predict larger earthquakes?

Lava flows reignite debate over safety of geothermal plant

Energy Resources Engineering professor Roland Horne comments on why geothermal plants are built close to active volcanoes like Hawaii's Kilauea. 

Navigate to Lava flows reignite debate over safety of geothermal plant

Governors on the Paris climate deal

Three governors cite research from Stanford's Marshall Burke and Noah Diffenbaugh in an op-ed calling on the U.S. government to join those confronting "the existential threat of climate change."

Navigate to Governors on the Paris climate deal

Following climate accord goals could save trillions of dollars

Stanford Earth's Noah Diffenbaugh discusses the economic value of goals set in the Paris climate agreement one year after President Trump announced plans to withdraw from the accord.

Navigate to Following climate accord goals could save trillions of dollars

The science behind Kilauea's eruption

Stanford Earth professor Paul Segall explains what Kilauea volcano's latest violent episode taught us about eruptions, how scientists determine when a dormant volcano will rumble to life  and more.

Navigate to The science behind Kilauea's eruption

Paris Agreement goals could save trillions in avoided damages

Marshall Burke and Noah Diffenbaugh of Stanford Earth explain scientific evidence refuting the idea that abiding by the Paris climate deal would harm the U.S. economy.

Navigate to Paris Agreement goals could save trillions in avoided damages

The world could save itself more than $20 trillion

Research by Stanford Earth professors Marshall Burke and Noah Diffenbaugh goes beyond environmental and health benefits to highlight the economic rewards of reducing global warming.

Navigate to The world could save itself more than $20 trillion

Hitting toughest climate target will save world trillions

Marshall Burke and Noah Diffenbaugh of Stanford Earth explain why they are confident that keeping climate change to 1.5˚C is likely to benefit the vast majority of the world's people.

Navigate to Hitting toughest climate target will save world trillions

Strict curbs on global warming would buoy world economy

A study led by Stanford Earth's Marshall Burke finds stringent limits on global warming would bolster the world economy. It's one of the first assessments of the economics of the 2015 Paris climate agreement.

Navigate to Strict curbs on global warming would buoy world economy

Missing climate goals could cost the world $20 trillion

Stanford's Marshall Burke and Noah Diffenbaugh explain, briefly, why there are trillions of reasons for the world to prevent temperatures from rising more than 1.5˚C.

Navigate to Missing climate goals could cost the world $20 trillion

Footage uncovers Antarctica's first scientific missions

Stanford Earth radio glaciologist Dustin Schroeder describes how he's using World War II-era radar films to understand the history of Antarctica's ice and project its future.

Navigate to Footage uncovers Antarctica's first scientific missions

The battle to save our dying soil

Earth System Science professor Rob Jackson comments on the power of hands-on restoration projects like Camp Altiplano in Spain to foster connection to the biosphere.

Navigate to The battle to save our dying soil

Why Kilauea's eruption won't cool the planet

Stanford Earth professor Rob Jackson explains what it would take for a volcanic eruption to cool the Earth.

Navigate to Why Kilauea's eruption won't cool the planet
maillinkedindouble carrot leftarrow leftdouble carrotplayerinstagramclosecarrotquotefacebooktwitterplusminussearchmenuarrowcloudclock