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Press Releases

In California, dry years coupled with warm conditions are more likely to lead to severe drought than dry, cool years, and the probability of warm and dry conditions coinciding is likely to increase under anthropogenic climate change. 

March 2, 2015

New technique exploits naturally occurring seismic waves to probe seafloor at less expense, and with fewer ill effects on marine life.

January 27, 2015

A new study by Frances Moore and Delavane Diaz finds that the ‘social cost’ of one ton of carbon dioxide emissions may not be $37, as previously estimated by a recent U.S. government study, but $220.

January 12, 2015

Adam Brandt's work on developing ways to reduce energy consumption and contamination of drinking water supplies from amine-based CO2 capture techniques is one of several projects that received funding this year from the Environmental Venture Projects seed grant program of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

July 3, 2014

NASA's new Orbiting Carbon Observatory satellite will make the most precise and accurate measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentrations from space that scientists have ever had, said Anna Michalak, who has been involved in the project for over a decade.

July 3, 2014

Bright spots in a large lake on Titan suggest that Saturn's largest moon supports processes similar to Earth's water cycle, says Howard Zebker.

June 27, 2014

It takes energy to make energy, whether it's renewable or a fossil fuel. Net energy analysis gauges the sustainability of energy technologies over time.

June 26, 2014

Computer simulations suggest climate change could lead to increased and prolonged air stagnation events in several regions of the world. These pockets of still air could contribute to hazardous air quality and impact human health.

June 23, 2014

Stanford Earth scientists prove that satellite-collected data can accurately measure aquifer levels, a finding with potentially huge implications for management of precious global water sources.

June 18, 2014

New Stanford research shows that enormous lakes that existed in the western United States during the peak of the last Ice Age grew large due to a cooler climate and a reduced evaporation rate. The finding could help improve computer simulations of climate change.

June 5, 2014

Stanford researchers have uncovered a vital clue about the mechanism behind a type of earthquake that originates deep within the Earth and accounts for a quarter of all temblors worldwide, some of which are strong enough to pose a safety hazard.

 

December 9, 2013

The uplift of two mountain ranges in Central Asia beginning 30 million years ago expanded the Gobi Desert and set Central Asia on its path to extreme aridity, a Stanford study suggests.

December 9, 2013

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