Stanford University
Torres del Paine in Chile by Nora Hennessy

Photo by Nora Hennessy

Climate change is the defining challenge of the 21st century

Human activities and resource use are altering Earth’s climate, through emissions of greenhouse gases and particulates, and through alteration of the land surface. Climate change, in turn, is affecting other Earth processes. Stanford Earth faculty work across disciplines—and at the interface of atmosphere, ocean, land, ice systems, and human behavior. They characterize climate changes and help develop adaptation strategies that matter to people.  

Stanford Climate Solutions

Finding Climate Solutions

At Stanford, we focus on understanding and communicating climate change risks, as well as how to limit and adapt to those changes.

Meet some of our faculty involved in Climate Solutions

Noah Diffenbaugh
Noah Diffenbaugh

Professor of Earth System Science

Rob Jackson
Rob Jackson

Professor of Earth System Science

Chris Field
Chris Field

Professor of Earth System Science and Biology

kate maher
Kate Maher

Associate Professor of Earth System Science

Dustin Schroeder
Dustin Schroeder

Assistant Professor of Geophysics

Alexandra Konings
Alexandra Konings

Assistant Professor of Earth System Science

Research highlight

Climate change has worsened global economic inequality

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Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

The institute creates research programs to tackle sustainability challenges and connects scholars with decision makers to develop practical solutions to real-world problems.

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Climate solutions-related news

Understanding the Arctic's hidden phytoplankton blooms

A growing body of evidence suggests tiny marine algae can bloom in the darkness below sea ice in the Arctic Ocean – and that such blooms occurred even before climate change began affecting the region's ice cover.

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Could kelp help relieve ocean acidification?

A new analysis of California’s Monterey Bay evaluates kelp’s potential to reduce ocean acidification, the harmful fallout from climate change on marine ecosystems and the food they produce for human populations.

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Undersea origins of Earth's mysterious Love waves

Supercomputer simulations of planetary-scale interactions show how ocean storms and the structure of Earth’s upper layers together generate much of the world’s seismic waves. Decoding the faint but ubiquitous vibrations known as Love waves could yield insights about Earth’s storm history, changing climate and interior.

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Reducing global food system emissions key to meeting climate goals

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from food systems will be vital for reaching climate goals – and it will require coordinated action across sectors and between national governments, according to new research. 

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