Stanford University
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Climate Solutions

Meeting the needs of a growing population is an essential challenge of the 21st century

Human activities and resource use are altering Earth’s climate, through emissions of greenhouse gases and particulates, and through alteration of the land surface. Climate change, in turn, is affecting other Earth processes. Stanford Earth faculty work across disciplines—and at the interface of atmosphere, ocean, land, and ice systems—to characterize climate changes as well as potential responses and outcomes that matter to people.  

Finding Climate Solutions

At Stanford, we focus on understanding and communicating climate change risks, as well as how to limit and adapt to those changes.

Meet some of our faculty involved in Climate Solutions

Noah Diffenbaugh
Noah Diffenbaugh

Professor of Earth System Science

Rob Jackson
Rob Jackson

Professor of Earth System Science

Chris Field
Chris Field

Professor of Earth System Science and Biology

kate maher
Kate Maher

Associate Professor of Earth System Science

Dustin Schroeder
Dustin Schroeder

Assistant Professor of Geophysics

Alexandra Konings
Alexandra Konings

Assistant Professor of Earth System Science

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

The institute creates research programs to tackle sustainability challenges and connects scholars with decision makers to develop practical solutions to real-world problems.

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Climate solutions-related news

What do the midterm results mean for environmental policy?

The recent midterm elections could have far-reaching implications for the direction of federal- and state-level environment and energy policy. Stanford experts discuss ways forward, lessons learned and more.

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Climate change, overharvesting may doom a pricey parasite

Stanford researchers show how warmer winters and booming demand for one of the world’s most expensive medicinal species may hurt ecosystems and communities in the Himalayas.

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Fish give up the fight after coral bleaching

A new study offers some of the first evidence that coral bleaching may trigger rapid and potentially disruptive change in fish behavior.

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Scientists find missing piece in glacier melt predictions

A new method for observing water within ice has revealed stored meltwater that may explain the complex flow behavior of some Greenland glaciers, an important component for predicting sea-level rise in a changing climate.

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