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Climate Solutions

Meeting the needs of a growing population is an essential challenge of the 21st century

Human activities and resource use are altering Earth’s climate, through emissions of greenhouse gases and particulates, and through alteration of the land surface. Climate change, in turn, is affecting other Earth processes. Stanford Earth faculty work across disciplines—and at the interface of atmosphere, ocean, land, and ice systems—to characterize climate changes as well as potential responses and outcomes that matter to people.  

Finding Climate Solutions

At Stanford, we focus on understanding and communicating climate change risks, as well as how to limit and adapt to those changes.

Meet some of our faculty involved in Climate Solutions

Noah Diffenbaugh
Noah Diffenbaugh

Professor of Earth System Science

Rob Jackson
Rob Jackson

Professor of Earth System Science

Chris Field
Chris Field

Professor of Earth System Science and Biology

kate maher
Kate Maher

Associate Professor of Earth System Science

Dustin Schroeder
Dustin Schroeder

Assistant Professor of Geophysics

Alexandra Konings
Alexandra Konings

Assistant Professor of Earth System Science

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

The institute creates research programs to tackle sustainability challenges and connects scholars with decision makers to develop practical solutions to real-world problems.

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Climate solutions-related news

Editing coral DNA in search for keys to survival

Stanford scientists and their colleagues have used the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system to modify genes in coral, a key step toward pinpointing natural gene variants that may help corals survive in warmer waters.

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Influence of early humans on mammal biodiversity occurred earlier than previously thought

Fossil study finds early human activity — not climate shifts — led to the systematic decline of large animals around the globe that predated human migration out of Africa. The findings add to concerns about continued biodiversity loss and the impact on ecosystems.

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A way for carbon capture at biorefineries to pay off

A new paper maps out how tax credits and possible incentives from state fuel standards could allow ethanol producers to profit from removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

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Swarms of tiny organisms churn ocean waters

Zooplankton may have an outsize influence on their environment, creating enough turbulence to influence global nutrient cycles and climate models.

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