Stanford University
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Climate Solutions

Meeting the needs of a growing population is an essential challenge of the 21st century

Human activities and resource use are altering Earth’s climate, through emissions of greenhouse gases and particulates, and through alteration of the land surface. Climate change, in turn, is affecting other Earth processes. Stanford Earth faculty work across disciplines—and at the interface of atmosphere, ocean, land, and ice systems—to characterize climate changes as well as potential responses and outcomes that matter to people.  

Finding Climate Solutions

At Stanford, we focus on understanding and communicating climate change risks, as well as how to limit and adapt to those changes.

Meet some of our faculty involved in Climate Solutions

Noah Diffenbaugh
Noah Diffenbaugh

Professor of Earth System Science

Rob Jackson
Rob Jackson

Professor of Earth System Science

Chris Field
Chris Field

Professor of Earth System Science and Biology

kate maher
Kate Maher

Associate Professor of Earth System Science

Dustin Schroeder
Dustin Schroeder

Assistant Professor of Geophysics

Alexandra Konings
Alexandra Konings

Assistant Professor of Earth System Science

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

The institute creates research programs to tackle sustainability challenges and connects scholars with decision makers to develop practical solutions to real-world problems.

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Climate solutions-related news

Summer reading: Sparking curiosity and conversations about our planet

Faculty at Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences recommend these 22 books for your summer reading.

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Modeling Earth’s chemistry: Making the invisible visible

Kate Maher discusses how researchers use computer modeling to better understand the chemical reactions in Earth’s subsurface that impact water supplies, energy waste storage, climate change and more.

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What to expect from wildfire season this year and in the future

The new normal for Western wildfires is abnormal, with increasingly bigger and more destructive blazes. Understanding the risks can help communities avert disaster.

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Does climate change cause armed conflict?

As global temperatures climb, the risk of armed conflict is expected to increase substantially. Extreme weather and related disasters can damage economies, lower farming production and intensify inequality.

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