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Securing The Energy Future

Energy is critical to nearly all human endeavors

As the world population grows to exceed 10 billion this century, how can we expand the energy system to meet human needs in ways that are both economically and environmentally sustainable? Stanford Earth and other schools at Stanford are investing heavily in research aimed at developing new approaches, technologies, and policies for a reliable, affordable, and low- or no-carbon energy future. As we move toward that future, our research aims to help ensure that fossil fuels are extracted and used as efficiently as possible, with the fewest negative consequences, and in a way that complements the growth of renewable resources.

How our scientists work toward the energy future

The world will use 100 million barrels of oil a day for the next 50 years, despite the march toward renewable energy. Will we do that in an uncontrolled way? Stanford Earth researchers are developing greener ways of extracting oil and mitigating the resulting greenhouse gases. Read more...
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Our top competencies in energy research

At Stanford Earth, our five core capabilities transcend specific types of energy resources and can be applied across the energy landscape. Read more.

Meet some of the faculty who are helping to secure the energy future

Margot Gerritsen
Margot Gerritsen

Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

Sally Benson
Sally Benson

Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

Lou Durlofsky
Lou Durlofsky

Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

Mark Zoback
Mark Zoback

Professor of Geophysics

Tony Kovscek
Tony Kovscek

Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

Jef Caers
Jef Caers

Professor of Geological Sciences

Water and Power in the Pacific Northwest

A Sophomore College undergraduate field learning course

Stanford Natural Gas Initiative (NGI)

The revolution in natural gas production has changed the energy outlook in much of the world and thrust this resource into the global spotlight as a potential bridge to a cleaner energy future. It has raised hopes, along with concerns. Watch.

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Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy

A university-wide resource for energy research, conferences, and connections.

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Energy-related news

Costa Rica: A 'decarbonization lab' for the world?

In a speech at Stanford, Costa Rican President Carlos Alvarado Quesada described a vision for the Central American country to phase out all carbon emissions by the year 2050. 

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Stanford energy experts discuss whether batteries can replace natural gas

Storing energy produced by wind or solar for later use has a challenge competing with existing natural gas-fired generation units. But batteries designed for the job could ease the way.

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Q&A: The dollars and sense of big batteries on the grid

Storing energy produced by wind or solar for later use has a challenge competing with existing natural gas-fired generation units. But batteries designed for the job could ease the way.

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As relicensing looms, aging dams face a reckoning

Green power source or fish killer? As older dams around the West come up for relicensing, their owners know that they’ll have to spend heavily to fix problems, while new energy sources are getting cheaper.

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