Stanford University
New York city lights

Securing The Energy Future

Energy is critical to nearly all human endeavors

As the world population grows to exceed 10 billion this century, how can we expand the energy system to meet human needs in ways that are both economically and environmentally sustainable? Stanford Earth and other schools at Stanford are investing heavily in research aimed at developing new approaches, technologies, and policies for a reliable, affordable, and low- or no-carbon energy future. As we move toward that future, our research aims to help ensure that fossil fuels are extracted and used as efficiently as possible, with the fewest negative consequences, and in a way that complements the growth of renewable resources.

How our scientists work toward the energy future

The world will use 100 million barrels of oil a day for the next 50 years, despite the march toward renewable energy. Will we do that in an uncontrolled way? Stanford Earth researchers are developing greener ways of extracting oil and mitigating the resulting greenhouse gases. Read more...
Navigate to item

Our top competencies in energy research

At Stanford Earth, our five core capabilities transcend specific types of energy resources and can be applied across the energy landscape. Read more.

Meet some of the faculty who are helping to secure the energy future

Margot Gerritsen
Margot Gerritsen

Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

Sally Benson
Sally Benson

Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

Lou Durlofsky
Lou Durlofsky

Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

Mark Zoback
Mark Zoback

Professor of Geophysics

Tony Kovscek
Tony Kovscek

Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

Jef Caers
Jef Caers

Professor of Geological Sciences

Water and Power in the Pacific Northwest

A Sophomore College undergraduate field learning course

Stanford Natural Gas Initiative (NGI)

The revolution in natural gas production has changed the energy outlook in much of the world and thrust this resource into the global spotlight as a potential bridge to a cleaner energy future. It has raised hopes, along with concerns. Watch.

Navigate to item

Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy

A university-wide resource for energy research, conferences, and connections.

Navigate to item

Energy-related news

Ahinoam Pollack and team finalists in the 2020 Geothermal Design Challenge

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO), in conjunction with Idaho National Laboratory (INL), hosted the 2020 Geothermal Design Challenge™: GIS Mapping Student Competition. The design challenge focused on a non-technical barrier to geothermal development.

Navigate to Ahinoam Pollack and team finalists in the 2020 Geothermal Design Challenge

A new approach to managing earthquake risk from fracking

Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing can damage property and endanger lives. Stanford researchers have developed new guidelines for when to slow or halt fracking operations based on local risks.

Navigate to A new approach to managing earthquake risk from fracking

Water heaters’ methane leaks are high, but fixable

Emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, from water heaters are higher than previously estimated, especially for a new type of heater growing in popularity, a new study finds. But simple fixes exist.

Navigate to Water heaters’ methane leaks are high, but fixable

Machine learning could speed the arrival of ultra-fast-charging electric cars

Using artificial intelligence, a Stanford-led research team has slashed battery testing times – a key barrier to longer-lasting, faster-charging batteries for electric vehicles – by nearly fifteenfold.

Navigate to Machine learning could speed the arrival of ultra-fast-charging electric cars
IconsList of icons used on the sitemaillinkedindouble carrot leftarrow leftdouble carrotplayerinstagramclosecarrotquotefacebooktwitterplusminussearchmenuarrowcloudclock