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Stanford was swimming with high school students who competed in the Sea Lion Bowl, a challenging ocean sciences quiz event. The School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences hosted the regional competition.

March 13, 2015

Four years after one of the largest earthquakes in recorded history devastated Japan, Stanford geophysicists Greg Beroza, Eric Dunham, and Paul Segall provide new insights that help clarify why previous assumptions about the fault had been so wrong.  Using new technologies, they explain what happened during the earthquake and tsunami, and discuss ongoing research that helps society better prepare for similar events in the future.

March 9, 2015

New research by Jonathan Payne's lab refutes a hypothesis by the famed evolutionary biologist Stephen J. Gould that marine creatures underwent an “early burst” of functional diversity during the dawn of animal life.

March 4, 2015

In California, dry years coupled with warm conditions are more likely to lead to severe drought than dry, cool years, and the probability of warm and dry conditions coinciding is likely to increase under anthropogenic climate change. 

March 2, 2015

Kate Maher and a team of scientists at Stanford and Vanderbilt Universities have created the first comprehensive map of the topsy-turvy climate of the western U.S. and are using it to test and improve the ability of global climate models to predict future precipitation patterns.

February 24, 2015

After changes in government policy and farm practices, European grain yields leveled off. Stanford's Frances C. Moore says climate trends account for 10 percent of that stagnation.

February 20, 2015

New Stanford research shows that animals tend to evolve toward larger body sizes over time. Over the past 542 million years, the mean size of marine animals has increased 150-fold.

February 19, 2015

Two-thirds of high seas fisheries are depleted or overfished, with impacts of climate change and marine pollution compounding the problem. Technology and political will can reverse the downward trend and move toward sustainability.

February 10, 2015

New research by a Stanford team shows that climate change is expanding the amount of U.S. agricultural land that is suitable for harvesting two crops per growing season, a system known as double cropping. The practice offers higher productivity and more income for American farmers, but future yield losses from climate change may still outstrip the gains from double cropping. 

February 10, 2015

The new name – the Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences – reflects the school’s focus on understanding the workings of the planet and helping address resource and environmental challenges facing the world. 

February 10, 2015

Energy Resources Engineering professor joins Earth Sciences Dean Pamela Matson (2005) and Prof. Rob Dunbar (2009) as winner of the Lyman Award, which recognizes faculty who go above and beyond to engage alumni on campus, regionally and around the world.

 

January 20, 2015

A new study by Frances Moore and Delavane Diaz finds that the ‘social cost’ of one ton of carbon dioxide emissions may not be $37, as previously estimated by a recent U.S. government study, but $220.

January 12, 2015

A new study by Roz Naylor and postdoctoral scholar Ling Cao offers the clearest picture to date of China’s enormous impact on wild fisheries. The study also presents a more sustainable alternative to the current practice of using wild-caught fish to feed farm-raised fish.

January 8, 2015

The fault responsible for the 9.0 magnitude Tohoku earthquake had been relieving stress at a gradually accelerating rate for years before the 2011 quake, according to findings from Prof. Paul Segall's research group.

December 16, 2014

Adam Brandt received a sustainable energy award to conduct an economic assessment on energy systems that use multiple feedstocks. The award was one of eight seed grants totaling about $1.5 million distributed by Stanford's Precourt Institute, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and TomKat Center.

December 12, 2014

Daniel Swain says the upcoming rainstorms this week – among the largest in recent years – will provide a short-term respite to California's drought, by far the state's most intense drought in the historical record. The rain will be good for ecosystems, salmon runs and reservoirs.

December 10, 2014

Earlier this fall, a team led by Rosemary Knight performed an ambitious experiment to determine the extent of ocean saltwater intrusion into freshwater aquifers in the Monterey Bay region.

December 6, 2014

A new study by Eric Lambin finds that the land in and around cities are increasingly becoming important centers of food production worldwide. 

 

November 20, 2014

Sensory Earth tells multimedia stories about how geoscientists use advanced technologies in creative ways to improve our sensory perceptions.  From stunning radar images to sounds of screaming volcanoes, we learn more about the planet when more of our senses are engaged.  Come explore our strange and wonderful world.

November 13, 2014

Jenny Suckale is endlessly fascinated by the Navier-Stokes equation, which she uses to study everything from volcanic eruptions to Antarctic ice flow. The story of how Suckale came to discover and love the Earth Sciences is as nonlinear as some of the natural phenomena she studies.

November 11, 2014

Professors in the School of Earth Sciences who are making ongoing and consistent contributions to teaching were recognized at a recent faculty dinner. 

November 11, 2014

The best way to learn science is to actually do it. Students in the School of Earth Science's Wrigley Field Program in Hawaii spend the quarter measuring vegetation, coral reefs and volcanoes to understand the dynamics of one of the planet's most interesting ecosystems.

November 5, 2014

Energy Resources Engineering Prof. Margot Gerritsen was named a Stanford Bass Fellow for contributions to undergraduate education.

October 24, 2014

Earth Systems sophomores Emma Hutchinson and Mary Cirino researched Earth's climate, from the strongest wind system on Earth to the tropical Pacific, as part of the Stanford School of Earth Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research (SESUR) program.

October 22, 2014

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